Re-Posted Clueless about Flueless

I really would appreciate any advice pro's/cons Sorry to post again
Hi Folks
I would like some advice on *Fluless gas fires.
Have read the brochure correctly that they can go almost anywhere that you want to put them in the brochure it shows one in front of a glass door (B&Q "The Fire place" page 32 Lascar Flueless stove).
The flueless gas fire would be ideal for me as there is no chimney just a flat wall and I wouldn't want to have a chimney built specially for a normal gas fire.
I have only the one outside wall and suppose I could have a balanced flue but that would mean that the *nice little youngsters in this area would enjoy stuffing the flue with garbage as they have done with our cooker hood outlet.
So is there anything that I should know without me getting a survey (40) done by B&Q but the 40 would be returnable if we got the fire from them.
To be truthful I don't want someone coming along who could be one of the cowboy outfits in the area,who as I have been told are next to useless.
The position I would want it is only about 2 feet from the main gas supply to the property.
Tia
Peace xxx
Ammer Chewer
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stuffing the flue with 'garbage'
??
are you american or just a wanna be?
steve
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On Fri, 19 Dec 2003 10:46:38 -0000, "R P McMurphey"
Redleaderone to Redleadertwo

Yes straight from the wastebins in this area

??
Neither m8 just after a bit of advice not a lot to ask is it ?

What's with the american bit ?
Peace xxx
Ammer Chewer
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Hammer Chewer wrote: <snip>

Maybe he's referring to you calling rubbish garbage.
As to flueless fires the combustion products have to go somewhere so if you do fit one expect lots of CO2 and H2O in the room the CO2 will diminish as oxygen (or rather ambient air) is allowed to swirl around the fire (via ventilation/draughts)but the H2O will form as condensate on EVERYTHING in the room so would strongly suggest you don't use one in a room were you value fixtures and fittings
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addy not usable (not that you would try it)
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Hi Folks
I would like some advice/help regarding flueless gas fires.
Anyone able to give an opinion.?
Come on lads I haven't got a disease that could be caught by giving me some sort of feedback.
I feel all neglected :-(
Peace xxx
Ammer Chewer
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Yep - don't use one.
Rob
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First off I am a novice at diy and I am not a time waster.
Thank's a lot Rob
Short and precise answer and I am much more informed now.
Btw I am talking about natural gas and not calor.
It looks like there is no one in the group know or have experience regarding these kind of gas fires apart from you Rob.
If there is anyone they being awfully quite.
This group is well known (and rightly so) for help and advice I have learnt a fair bit just reading the Q&A's and will only ask questions when I am unsure about something which in this case I am.
Although this is a diy ng I suspect that there are a few professional and or highly competent people who's answers to questions are highly regarded by myself and will remain so.
Peace xxx
Ammer Chewer
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Do you mean flueless or power flue?
Flueless are generally poor. They give out little heat and if you want a "real look" you can't because the fire will be glass fronted. The technology is new and as yet unreliable.
If you are installing on a external wall with no flue then consider a power flue. They are more expensive and will need an electrical supply as well as gas but they work well.
DON'T buy the cheapest though. Budget around 900 inc fitting for the fire plus any surround that you may want.
The do make a slight noise when on due to the external fan but no more noise that some conventional gas fires. They also look the part - open fronted. The more you pay the better they look and the less noise you get. Cheap ones are around 600 but not as nice.
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wrote:

Flueless
The only external wall I have has the original chimney stack slap bang in the center with an alcove either side...But
The chimney as been removed down to bedroom ceiling above the room in question and as been re-roofed over it..Also we have no idea of what the chimney is like it would probably cost a small fortune to open it up and re-build it..plus all the very nice wardrobes in the room above would have to come out if there are problems within the stack.
I wouldn't want a gas fire in either alcove so a balanced flue is also out of the question as would be a power flue.
The room is only 13' x 13' x 8'
I as been suggested that if the breast be opened (safely) as high as possible then remove a stone (gable end wall) at the back of the stack from the outside then put in a metal flue.
The reasons I have asked about Flueless is it seems to be my only way out of the mess I seem to have on my hands.
I am disabled and have to rely on other people to do most jobs for me I am sometimes able to do jobs sitting down I tiled the bathroom all sitting on my bum I have made two fire surrounds three blanket boxes 4 coffee tables most of my work as been for other people as much as finding something to do.I can't leave the house and I dread being in a car the vibration is really painful so a lot of my gear is bought via the net.

I was hoping for more feedback that may help me to make up my mind and so far I have had only to replies both almost saying don't.
Thank you for your reply
Peace xxx
Ammer Chewer
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Errrm, there's nothing to stop you having either a powered flue running up the old chimney or a balanced flue exiting through the back of the old chimney. We have a large oil-fired boiler with a power flue and the flue runs up the old wash-copper chimney and the terminal is fitted to the roof. Just as with yours a previous owner had tiled over the old chimney but ut was relatively easy to open it up again. The cost was small against the total cost of purchase and installation.
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"Hammer Chewer" wrote | The only external wall I have has the original chimney stack slap | bang in the center with an alcove either side...But | The chimney as been removed down to bedroom ceiling above the room in | question and as been re-roofed over it..Also we have no idea of what | the chimney is like it would probably cost a small fortune to open it | up and re-build it..plus all the very nice wardrobes in the room above | would have to come out if there are problems within the stack. | I wouldn't want a gas fire in either alcove so a balanced flue is also | out of the question as would be a power flue. | I as been suggested that if the breast be opened (safely) as high as | possible then remove a stone (gable end wall) at the back of the stack | from the outside then put in a metal flue.
Depending on the width of the chimney breast, probably related to the age and style of the house, would it be possible to open up the hearth and then mount a through-the-wall flueless fire on the back wall, creating an inglenook effect?
Alternatively, some flueless fires might be able to cope with a straight through-the-wall flue long enough to go from the hearth through the disused chimney void and to the outside. Not my area of expertise, so these are no more than sug-guess-tions, but some boiler fanned flues can go a long way.
Owain
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So does that tell you something?!
You could install a power flue fire in a chimney breast anyway. Whatever fire you choose if it's an inset type you will need to remove bricks and insert a lintel to support brickwork above.
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If the breast has been removed down to the ceiling of the room, does that mean there is still a flue going up from the ceiling of that room?
If so, put a small stove/fire in that will have a metal flue going up to the ceiling and into what is left of the old flue. Even if you had to open up the top end of the flue again, it would give you the best route to outside for flue gasses and opening up the top should not be too expensive.
HTH ROb
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