Re: More about water pipe earthing



Don't. Plastic pipes do not need earthing. There is no advantage (and plenty of disadvantages) in ensuring continuity when metal pipework is separated by plastic. Small bits of metal isolated from everything else (i.e. metal taps fed by plastic pipes) do not need bonding.
Christian.
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Some choice quotes from:
http://www.iee.org/Publish/WireRegs/EarthingPlasticPipes.pdf

For entirely plastic pipework, it recommends to bond:

It continues:

Hope this helps.
Christian.
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P.S.
The thrust of the document is to encourage the use of plastic pipework. The IEE believes that plastic pipework and the subsequent lack of earthing potentials in the room is a safer environment than an bonded earthed metal one. If there have to be earthed potentials in the room, it is best that they are the same, however, which is what supplementary bonding is about.
Christian.
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The
Thanks for the replies, I should have mentioned that all my plumbing uses copper pipe with plastic push-fit joints but I gather the answer is the same.
I will take attitude that unless there is the remotest chance of a tap, radiator etc. coming in contact with a live wire then there is no need to earth it - any pipework under the floor is effectively isolated by the push-fit joint.
Regards
Earl
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metal
about.
I don't think so. The IEE document is silent on the scanario of metal pipework with plastic joints, but its recommendation not to earth bond metal fittings connected by plastic pipework is based on the resistance of water in plastic pipework providing a level of insulation such that bonding is not required. However where you have metal pipework with plastic joints you only have a few millimetres of water separating conductive lengths and the resistance of the water can not be expected to provide anything like the same protection as metres of plastic pipe, so in your case exposed metal pipes in the bathroom _should_ be bonded.

AIUI the reason all-metal pipework should be bonded is that in _any_ house with an electricity supply there is a remote risk of pipework being made live. Of course a responsible installer would not install either cabling or pipework in such a way that there was a substantial risk, but unforseen circumstances can create such a situation and the bonding is there as a safety measure (belt _and_ braces :-)
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