Re: Heating & hot water crisis - advice sought

On 3 Jul 2003 12:02:28 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

Yep, sounds very similar to what happened to mine!

Yes, I think you're probably right.

Good point. I didn't consider putting a new gaspipe in to feed the new multipoint. Fairly easy route: straight up the inside of the cupboard under the stairs from the meter to the landing then under the bathroom floor and up to the multipoint.

Do you mean the Thames? http://www.mainheating.co.uk/waterheaters/thames/thamespage.htm .
How easy was it to fit?
Thanks for your input Andrew.
Trevor.
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I'd need to put a tank in somewhere but it's an attraction option.
Thanks,
Trevor.
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New one has protection against boiling -- the pilot thermocouple is connected via a thermal cutout which would cut off the gas control valve if the temperature of the heat exchanger gets too hot.

Actually I meant the Medway. The Thames is the top of the range which I probably couldn't justify personally, but local supplier didn't have the Thames in stock anyway and I needed it that day.

Very easy, but I'm afraid I don't recommend you fit it yourself unless you are familiar with the Gas safety regs and fully competent to do gas work, in which case you probably wouldn't ask. The water and gas pipework needed rearranging as the inlets/outlets were not in the same place as its predecessor (a Main Medina IIRC).
--
Andrew Gabriel

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That's what I've decided to do. I'm waiting on a couple of quotes for installation of a new J&S warm air unit.

The same idea had occurred to me. However, the gas engineer said it was not possible to install a combi and only use the DHW circuit because if the combi overheated it needed to dump the heat into the radiator circuit.
Any views on this?

A combined header/DHW tank isn't that space consuming. The biggest attraction for me is that a hot water cylinder has a backup electric immersion for use if ever there's a problem with the gas.
Trevor.
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wrote:

You won't regret it.

It depends on the model.

You can do this by using an instant hot water heater. If you want back up fit an in-line electric instant shower heater. This will give a trickle of a shower, but fine for backup. Juts turn one valve and open another and it is brought into action. It can be fitted in the loft, or in a cupboard, out of the way. It can also be in the outlet line of a combi or muti-point with hot combi water passing throught it when switched off, then no valves to turn to bring it in, just switch it on. Piped up right, it can do the whole house, but only supplying one tap at a time - fine for backup.
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