Re: Garden Shredder

Page 1 of 2  
Get a goat then you can keep the bin for your DIY rubble, or disposing of "Her Indoors!"
Seriously though, wheelie bins are great. I've had mine for years and have got rid of all sorts of crap in it. Whenever I've put building rubble in it I've always expected to see it still sitting unemptied by the kerb, but they always take it.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I bought a Bosch 2kW one a couple of years ago and find it quiet and excellent. It works on a screw principle rather than a plate with revolving blades. Unlike the latter, it rarely bungs up and when it does there is a reverse switch which invariably resolves the problem.
Recommended.
.andy
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've got a Bosch 2kw shredder and I fully agree with everything that Andy has said.
Wasn't cheap at 230 ... but worth it just for the fun you'll have.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
eBay have this one for auction...
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item#38666396&category186

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:
snip

What sort of stuff do you feed throught it.
We have a Bear Cat with a petrol engine powering it. It will chew up branches as thick as your wrist but chokes on very green stuff. We have a Leylandii hedge along one boundary which is 15 ft high and a couple of hundred yards long. It gets a once yearly trim and the branches make a good mulch but it is very tedious to keep stopping to clear the blockages with the green stuff.
I have been tempted to get one o fthe Bosch ones such as you have but someone else said they were as prone to blockage on green stuff as the one we have.
What do you think ?
Paul Mc Cann
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 04 Aug 2003 19:14:32 +0100, Paul Mc Cann

Various things.
I have a low hedge on the far side of my garage which is something like a Cotoneaster. It gets clipped with a hedge trimmer and the clippings, which tend to be quite long in some cases go through OK.
One of my neighbours has a row of trees similar to Leylandii but I guess a dwarf variety since they are slower growing and not as tall. This needs to be cut back periodically. The branches are typically up to a couple of cm and go through OK.
I just got rid of a Hazel that had grown to about 3m and was in the way. That had branches up to 3cm joining a fairly short trunk. All went through apart from the trunk.
The only things that don't work that well are if the material is very wet. However, a couple of days in a pile to dry and it goes through OK. Likewise, thin springy plants like creepers when freshly cut tend to spring away from the screw. Again a couple of days to dry and they go through OK.
These last two issues are the same with any shredder, I think, but this one is mmuch less likely to jam up and can be easily unbunged with the reverse switch.
I find one good technique is to keep back some of the more woody material and put that through with the leafy stuff. It then pulls it through.

.andy
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote: snip

snip
Thanks Andy. I'm getting very tempted to give one a go.
IPaul Mc cann
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ricardo wrote:

Hi Ricardo,
Unfortunately the bin has a very large permit stuck to it. This indicates exactly what can and cannot be disposed of in it.
Cheers
Richard
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bosch 2000 without doubt but with the exception of leylandii why not mix the shreddings with grass etc and make usefull compost

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Make that another vote for the Bosch. But don't throw the clipping in the bin, spread them round the garden in the autumn and lightly dig them in; by spring they'll be gone.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 02 Aug 2003 17:42:50 +0100, Richard Savage wrote:

If you can afford it go for the screw action type rather than high speed rotating knives. The latter are incredibly noisy, ear defenders are must and that's *before* you feed it anything...

We have one but the only stuff that goes into it are the nasties that we don't want in our own compost. Things like Thistles, Ragwort, Dandelions, Ground Elder etc. Everything else compostable goes into our (discounted by the council) compost bins for recycling onto the garden.
Why not do similar?
--
Cheers snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com
Dave. pam is missing e-mail
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
`

My cheap (c 90) B&Q "no-name" shredder of the rotating blade type was a load of c**p. It started off well on light(ish) garden waste but after about half an hour it was struggling, the blades were blunt. I turned over the double sided blades and it was back to shredding. However on tackling some thin privet branches that were less than a quarter of the diameter of the advertised capacity the blades became blunt within 5 minutes.

One vote against the cheaper options.
The whole point of the shredder was to reduce garden waste to a size suitable for composting as fast as possible and not spending a lot of time continually sharpening blades.
--
Alan
mailto:news2me_a snipped-for-privacy@amacleod.clara.co.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"........ However on tackling some thin privet branches that were less than a quarter of the diameter of the advertised capacity the blades became blunt within 5 minutes. ..........."
I use a heavy duty petrol driven chipper/shredder and Find that privet only about 3/4 inch makes it struggle where as I can put Ash almost 1 1/2 in thick goes through with almost no problem. Its easy to forget they some woods are much harder than others. Hawthorn is quite easy when green but I'd hate to try putting dry hawthorn through. I remember ruining many Bow saw blades logging seasoned hawthorn wood. It's not always the fault of the machine, the makers cant specify the thickness of every wood, and they are going to show their machine in the best light.
--
David Hill
Abacus nurseries
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snipped>

whereas my JCB 1800W was not. It did the job required, dealing with dry Leylandii branches up to about 40mm across, even though 35mm was the recommended maximum. The only time it objected was when the material was wet, when inevitably it was much more prone to jamming. (Easy solution: leave things to dry out...)

I think *as fast as possible* is a bit of a giveaway. Whacking half a wet tree down a cheap shredder's throat is probably not the way to expect optimum results!:O)

My point about cost is not simply an objection to unnecessary spending (and the whole consumer-based, rat-race economy), but also about the misplaced assumption that a good tool will necessarily make for a better job. Obviously a quality tool will stay sharper longer (etc., etc.), but if I only need to do something once then I'm competent enough to produce the desired result with a cheap tool. However, I'm happy to agree to differ...
Cheers! Gilbert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I must agree with Gilbert,
My B&B 1800W rotating blade version was bought in a B&Q sale a few years ago for 80 or 90gbp.
I only use it twice a year when I cut the holly back and a one off when I removed a neighbour's 'london weed tree'...[ash?] as a favour [and to give me more light]
If I had the type of garden that needed a monthly 'shred', I'd buy the better one, but then I could afford it!
I also use screwfix 'budget' power tools, and have not had one fail yet.
I recently cut off a six inch dia apple tree branch with all it's associated branches, twigs etc...about 10' long. Not having the shredder with me I cut all the branches up to about 10mm into 6" bits with secateurs, and the larger ones into 12" lengths with a bowsaw and it all fitted into 2 1/2 old style dustbins, for distribution amongst the neighbours' wheelie bins on collection day.
Andy
--
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com ).
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a Ryobi shredder, it's not as quiet as a Bosch but it will handle leaves and juicy stuff much better. It has three different inlets one for leaves, one for clippings and another on the side for branches.
I previously owned a Bosch 1600 quiet shredder and I found although it was very good for small branches and cuttings, it tended to block up very easy with soft stuff. The reversing switch did not always clear the blockages and then it was a pig to unblock.
Martin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If your going to shred everything why not compost it at home and use it as Mulch, path material etc???
--
David Hill
Abacus nurseries
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

&
Pleased to hear of this offer as I was 60 on 25th July. So not only can I get 10% off at B & Q on Wednesdays but I also can now obtain free prescriptions for painkillers when I injure myself :-) When does the joy end! Seriously though, I'm available to take advantage of this offer in the Teesside area - just buy me a pint!
Terry D.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 3 Aug 2003 01:24:40 +0100, "Terry D"

Another vote for the Bosch screw feed here....I originally bought a B&Q own brand shredder that just has a rotatng disc with two blades...absolutely useless and a pain during it's frequent blockages...that got taken back for a refund the next day. The Bosch is superb, except on very wet/sappy stuff that can form a thick gunge...which you can reverse feed out to clear.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

very
I believe that "slow worms" are legless lizards, looking like small snakes rather than large worms. Sometimes killed when mistaken for snakes. Good for the garden in that they eat small pests. hth Neil
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.