Re: Fridges: weird "fast freeze" switch

cos I think the fridge you are talking about fails to work when the difference between the inside and outside temperature is low, but must admit 18oC seems quite high :s. Quite alot of new fridges have this "problem" so i suppose instead of your fridge defrosting the switch makes it work (probably continuously)

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"D.M. Procida" wrote:

Hi Danielle,
I expect this is a single compressor fridge freezer. It is widely know (especially in this NG) that this type of machine has a design compromise whereby if the room temperature is too low, the compressor does not switch on and the freezer defrosts.
Do not let the house temperature drop too low , for example if you go away for a few days in the winter months otherwise you will return to a freezer full of thawed goods. Also never install these types in the garage for the same reason.
hth
Bob
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The fast freeze switch makes the compressor come on more, which makes the freezer part colder. If you install in a cold location, the thermostat, which is in the fridge part, may never come on, so it needs a bit of a boost to get it to work. You'll probably find your fridge starts freezing, though. This type of fridge freezer is not really suitable for installation in anything other than a heated habitable room.
Christian.
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Bob Minchin wrote:

You can get freezers with two compressors? I didn't know. I am considering buying a large chest freezer which will be sited in an unheated outside garage. What should I look for?
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*Fridge freezer*. One for the fridge, one for the freezer.
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jerrybuilt wrote:

No Freezers only have one compressor. Some expensive, properly designed fridge freezer have two but most FF have one compressor and arrange through a design compromise to share the cooling circuit between one cabinet at about +3 degrees and the other at -21 degrees .
If you are looking for a freezer for use in a garage I advise to make sure the base (outside) is made of metal. Some have a form of foilcoated cardboard for the base. This in time becomes saturated with condensation from the garage floor which usually has no damp proof membrane and then lets water into the foam.this decreases the insulation value hence more condensation and starts rust on the cooling pipes buried in the foam. after a few years, all the gas leaks out.
There are three ways chest freezers get rid of their excess heat. 1) Grill or plate with tubes welded on at the back of the freezer (no specific name that I'm aware of) 2) By a fan blowing air though a little radiator (fan assisted) 3) through the front, ends and back surface of the cabinet (Skin cooled)
Type one is most common and works Ok
Fan assisted ones are good in the garage as they force some air circulation.
The skin cooled ones are my favourite for garages as the outside of the case is warmed regularly and this dries off the demon condensation which the other two types do not and which tend to rust the outer casing. This is only cosmetic but soon looks crap. However, the running costs of skin types can be dearer or need thicker insulation (less room inside for a given exterior size) as the inside of the freezer is at -21 degrees and the outside can get to 50 or 60 degree wehn the compressor runs.
Whichever type you buy, I suggest your stand it off the floor by a couple of bricks height and dont push it back against a wall which allows plenty of air to circulate around.
All based on 25 years plus of freezers in outbuildings.
Regards
Bob
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I think this info might be a bit out of date. There are now FF's with a single compressor but still with independant control using a solenoid valve which allows the refrigerent to be directed.
The older (and possibly current cheaper) units rely only on a thermostat in the fridge, and based on a temperature of something like 14C ambient minimum, they know the compressor will operate on sufficient duty cycle to keep freezer cold enough. If the ambient drops below the minimum for that FF, then the fridge won't need as much cooling, and the freezer will start to warm up.

Can also drip in the floor, and depending on the covering, damage it. Uprights often have anti-condensation heaters around the door seal, where most cold leak out ;-)
--
Andrew Gabriel

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Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Hmm! Is this why the edge of my ff is warm to the touch in summer? front edge of side wall, but different levels of heat depending on where you put your hand in a vertical line up the corner (if that makes sense)?
Velvet
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Yes. Sometimes it's an electric element (possibly with a switch), and sometimes it's one of the warm refrigerent pipes routed just under the surface.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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D.M. Procida wrote:

There was a thing on Watchdog a while back about fridges/freezers not working in cold rooms. Hmmm, I can't remember exactly why they don't work, but they need a warmish room to do their thing.
Cheers Tim
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