Re: cheap alternative for kitchen worktop jig?

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clangers snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk (Steve North) wrote in message

If you already have a suitable router then it is still cheaper than paying someone to do the cuts. They quite often come up second hand on ebay. Also there are cheaper new ones on ebay but I bought the Trend one as it's a known reputable brand.

The instructions with the trend one are good. I would add keep the cutter bit clean. Be prepared to use more than one new cutter for that many joins (or maybe a better cutter will stay sharper longer?. Do a couple of cuts with each new cutter and then do the bolt recesses with the used cutters.

IMHO 45 deg cuts are fine but you waste more worktop as each piece has to be long enough to reach into the corner. May not be an issue if you have length to spare from a standard length worktop. You still need some way to ensure you get the "same" 45 deg on each piece.
Andrew
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Andrew wrote:

I would have thought the trick is to make one of the 45 deg cuts, and then place the uncut bit into position in the corner and lay the cut bit in position but on top of it, and use it to mark the exact cut angle needed. This should automatically take into account any variation intruduced by the corner not being perfectly square.
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Cheers,

John.

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On Thu, 25 Sep 2003 23:51:35 +0100, John Rumm wrote:

That won't work. If you did that and the corner wasn't 90 degrees, the front edge won't meet up properly. If you do do a mitre right across, the two pieces have to have the same angle.
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John Armstrong wrote:

Depends on how far of square it is I suppose - a couple of degrees is not going to make that much difference in the slant length of the cut. Also any small discrepancy can be positioned at the back against the wall where it will normally be obscured by the worktop to wall seal.
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John.

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On Tue, 30 Sep 2003 05:08:16 +0100, John Rumm wrote:

I am used to dealing with my house which definitely isn't square :-) One corner of my kitchen is around 5 degrees out of square, which if you cut one of the bits of worktop with a straight 45deg cut would have that diagonal cut 65mm longer than the other. If it was 2 degrees out the difference woud still be 28mm.
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On Mon, 29 Sep 2003 21:52:20 +0100, John Armstrong

You are technically correct. However a small discrepancy with the angle on one side would most probably not cause a noteworthy problem. The biggest issue here would be at the back edge of the worktop where the two corner pieces meet - one would be longer than the other causing a slight overhang - but as the rear edge of worktops is invariably covered by tiling and similar wall covering that's not normally a big problem to hide.
I recently acquired a 650mm Screwfix worktop jig. The thing I noted fairly quickly was that it takes a little care to align the plastic pins to the workpiece - if you apply pressure to the alignment then the angle could change very, very slightly. I guess I was a bit surprised that the alignment wasn't more precise in that respect.
I don't see that as a fault of the jig, most likely more of a feature to enable you to offset the angle very slightly in the event you might want to do so, to take account of angles between walls which aren't precisely 90 degrees (and let's face it, few are).
PoP
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