Radiator Positioning

Hi all - it's been a while, but time to dust off the pipebender again and get back to some DIY :-)
I need to replace the ancient rad in the sitting room with a correctly sized one (have done all the calcs) and have two choices:
1) 3 rads in the bay using the "uk.d-i-y approved" method of joining them ;-) or 2) one in the bay and one on the opposite, internal, wall, near the door.
The room has always suffered from a draught coming from the adjacent entrance hall (may improve when we do the front door....eventually) so I'm wondering whether putting a rad near the door (opposite wall to the bay) may help this?
Equally, I'm worried that the two rads opposite each other may create some strange up- and down-draught effect and I might do better with the classic rad-under-window approach.
(Current rad is neither under the window, nor on the wall opposite - it is on the adjacent wall; and woefully undersized).
"x" marks the possible positions.
| | hallway | ------------------------------\ door ------ ___| \ | / x \ x| / x x| |x x| |x | |x | |x | another room |x | |x | \ x | \ x | | |-----------| | |-------------| |------------------------------- outside
Any opinions?
Thanks.
Tim Hardisty. Remove HAT before replying
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"Tim Hardisty" wrote | 2) one in the bay and one on the opposite, internal, wall, near the | door. | The room has always suffered from a draught coming from the adjacent | entrance hall (may improve when we do the front door....eventually) so | I'm wondering whether putting a rad near the door (opposite wall to | the bay) may help this?
Sounds useful. Also the space right next to the door looks to be too narrow for much in the way of furniture, so using it for a radiator might release some space at the window for some window seats with storage under.
Owain
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I am an Under The Window man Tim, but I always like to place a shelf, of about an inch wider than the radiator, along the top of them. You know that all surfaces give off a downward convection when they are cold, well the shelf is supposed to help in keeping a balance between the hot rising air from the rad, which the shelf forces out and away from, and cold falling air from the window, which the shelf catches and warms, and seems to move it more evenly around the rest of the room.
I know the theory behind it and, when I tried it, I have seen it actually increase the temperature of a room by a good 1 degree over a set time, faster than a radiator on any other wall in the room (yes, I am an incessant experimenter). And as for the draught coming in the door. I always tell people that the hallway is always the most important heating spot in the house, as it is the central part of the house and is subject to all doors and movement that goes back and forth throughout the house. So it is always a idea to put the largest possible radiator, or divide it up, in the hallway and help to prevent the movement of the colder air getting back in to the main relaxation areas.
Many systems today, in my opinion, have very inadequate radiators around the area they're supposed to be heating. When we have the advent of Thermostatic Rad' Valves and ever more accurate wall stat's, it is not rocket science to over specify the radiators and boiler slightly, not to much, and have all these different devices control all the differing functions of each area of the house.
Just my two pennith, and I can ramble on a bit, eh ?
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On Mon, 29 Sep 2003 14:16:52 GMT, "BigWallop"

<snip convincing argument about rads under windows, with shelf over>
Thanks "BigWallop" - I will probably be replacing the window boards anyway, so could replace with boards that project over the rad(s); the height of the window boards is perfect for this. In fact, the window height is part of the reason that I have to go for three rads in the bay as I can only get 450mm tall units under the windows.

Hmm - it would not be too much hassle to replace the hall rad at the same time - it is currently back to back with the existing sitting room rad that I'm removing so I might as well replace it as re-plumb the pipework associated with it.
I tend to get "single track minded" when I do a room; the hall is next year, so I blinkered myself to think only about the sitting room.

Certainly true of ours, before I got to it.

Just what I have done, and am going around room by room sorting out the rad sizes. And fitted (3 years ago) a generously sized condensing gas boiler.
Thanks for your opinions - they're much appreciated.
Cheers. Tim Hardisty. Remove HAT before replying
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Position of radiators is not really your problem as there is no strict rule on position. Usually under window simple to avoid using up another wall space, as window takes up one wall then simple equation is to place radiator under window.Will stree that any cold breeze through window usually ends up mixing with convected heat from radiator.Then you close your curtains and usually end up draggging settee in front of radiator as well.
Your main concern is radiator size you will not require two rads on opposite sides of room, as correct radiator output should meet your requirements.Also look at TRVs and remote sensing device as this will detect any temperature change and act accordingly.
Regards Keith
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