Qualifications for Electrician?

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We do have such a rule, whether it's observed 100% is another matter.
The one I read the label from was, indeed, a two core flex.
--
Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

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wrote:

I think you've made Mr Prescott's point for him. Could a skilled amateur have done this? <g>
What testing should be done apart from earth pin of plug to metal of case? Without knowing exactly what's involved the idea of pushing HV test voltages around electronics sounds a bit worrying
--
Tony Bryer SDA UK 'Software to build on' http://www.sda.co.uk
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In my previous two jobs, I had some involvement in the electrical work. For PAT testing, we insisted the contractors turned up with their own C&G certificates on the first day, and we couldn't find any NICEIC companies who had qualified PAT testers. We used independant qualified electricians in the end who did have the qualification. In one case, we had to get the company rule changed which had required use of NICEIC contractors - it was changed to require use of _qualified_ contractors, which in practice ruled out the NICEIC companies we had been using as they seemed unable to supply any qualified staff to do work.

The first thing is a check on the equipment being suitable for the use it is put to. For example, you would fail a PAT test on a hot air paint stripper with nothing wrong with it if it was being used as a hair drier. (This is why you must inspect appliances where they are being used, and not have them brought to some central test location where such misuse would not be aparent.)
Next is a formal visual inspection. Check the plug, lead, casing, etc for signs of damage, and also check the socket outlet for signs of overheating (might show up there rather than on the plug). Check plug fuse rating and that fuse is marked with appropriate BS and in the case of BS1362, it must also be marked ASTA approved (diamond symbol). For a rewirable plug, remove the top and check connections and cord grip. If the appliance is being checked prior to being sold, the plug must have sleeved pins. In any case, the plug must have a broadened base to discourage fingers being wrapped round underneath it during withdrawal (this change came in the 1950's -- would need to be a very old plug to fail that).
Check the appliance conforms to IP2X (no finger can reach any live parts). A common failure here are old bar heaters where the grill has too wide spacing. The silica glass tube of a radiant element counts as a live part for this check. Lampholders are excluded from IP2X test.
Note the general condition of the appliance, how quickly it is wearing out, and if it will thus merit more frequent inspections than it would otherwise get. This implies some record keeping. You might fail an appliance because it is of inappropriate quality, e.g. a domestic kettle might not be up to continuous use in an office, or would only be so with very high frequency of PAT inspection/testing.
You have now done the most important part of the test -- the formal visual inspection. This is the part which picks up some 95% of test failures. This is the part which is skipped by people who don't know how to do a PAT test. The only tool required was a screwdriver. You do not go any further with the testing if there are any failures here -- indeed it is dangerous to do so.
The next stage is to actually use an appliance tester. How you test the equipment depends on lots of things relating to the type of equipment and how it is earthed. In some cases, no testing is possible. For Class I (earthed metal case) appliances, one of the tests does involve checking the earth continuity, but the method varies depending how much current your tester can provide to do this. You don't use HV test voltages around electronics unless the appliance claims to conform to EN 60950 or BS 7002, in which case it has been designed to withstand the 500VDC test. Instead, you do an earth leakage test. Again, you should keep records to check for deterioration, and spot that more frequent testing may be required. In the case of a rapid deterioration, even though still within spec, this could be the cause for a test failure pending discovery of the cause. Likewise, records could show over time that you don't need to test so often.
Finally, it's a good idea to do a functional check, because otherwise you will get laughed at for passing an electric drill which simply doesn't turn, although it may not necessarily be unsafe.
BTW -- this is from memory, and I haven't done it for some time, so I may have missed some parts out.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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writes:

Better not let anyone see me lighting the barbecue then ...
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wrote:

Crude, crude. The wonderful George Goble website, which has, unfortunately, been removed by his masters at Purdue university (since June)showed video clips of him lighting barbecues with a gallon or two of liquid oxygen. The number of US states that permitted him to do this was dropping however! Mad as a hatter and there aren't enough people like him in the world.
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Bob Mannix
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On 21 Aug 2003 10:23:42 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

Didn't anybody tell you about the micro-UPS that Sparc chips have on board - right on the die?. Only runs under Linux, though :-)
.andy
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wrote:

LOL!
Andrew
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