Qu: Shower Pumps

My plumber plans to put in a separate dual-impeller pump for each of my three showers. A colleague has suggested that since this is a new installation it would be better to have 2 better single impellers (one hot, other cold. Does anyone have an opinion on this?
Many thanks Potsie
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Hi Potsie,
Yes ! The answer would be to fit Central Heating Pumps to both your hot and cold supply pipes to lift the pressure in the whole system and not just to the showers. That way you cut down on maintenance costs, only to pumps to look after, shower installation costs, you could install a larger range of decent showers, and running costs because the power used by two central heating pumps on demand switches would be less.
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Don't you need bronze pumps in this situation?
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On Fri, 04 Jul 2003 09:36:52 GMT, "BigWallop"

For an application like this, the pumps must be brass or bronze - which CH ones are not.
An alternative is simply to put in a large single pump and run all three from it. Stuart Turner have a good range with details on their web site.
.andy
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I am about to run a second shower off my dual impeller pump - the pump can allegedly run two showers at once (rated 3 Bar). Given that the showers will not always be used at the same time this should be more than adequate. However, we will see :-)
You can get larger pumps which I presume could run three at once.
It is not clear to me if two single impeller pumps are better than a twin impeller - I presume they probably would be, but would be more expensive.
I see no particular reason to have three seperate pumps; they would all be sucking on the same hot water tank which could cause interesting problems if they are not set up right, and would at a minimum have some interesting pipework.
I would feel happier with a single bigger pump pressurising the hot water system and not competing with the other pumps for the hot water cylinder. [Same goes for the tank fed cold.]
BTB you are going to need the mother of all hot water cylinders (and cold water header tank) if you are planning to run three power showers at the same time :-)
HTH Dave R
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Potsie,
I recently fitted a Salamander ESP75CPV which pressurises the whole hot and cold water system so that you get power wherever you need it. As one of the other responders says though, I had to replace the HWC and the cold water tanks to make sure I had enough stored up.
Why not ask Pumpwise helpline FREE www.pumpwise.co.uk or 0870 855 4200 Mon-Fri 9-5 they'll send you a free booklet all about required storage, pressures, negative head, postive head etc. They were really helpful.
Good luck!
Hugh
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I'm looking at pumps at the moment. The advice in B&Q is you can have one more powerful pump for a multi-shower installation.
I read somewhere else that pumps should have a dedicated pipe, assume that is input pipe though.

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