Pumping hot water upstairs

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The pipes "must" be lagged. A quick recovery cylinder works better with gravity than a Part L.
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For DIY, and at the risk of sounding like IMM, a heat bank might be more appropriate than an unvented cylinder if you intend to do it yourself. In this design, the water within the cylinder is stored unpressurised with inhibitor, making them inherently safer and not requiring all the safety features needed by unvented cylinders.
To install is very simple. In fact, they are much simpler than a conventional gravity cylinder to install. The indirect heating coil is connected up, just like the conventional gravity cylinder. It requires pumped flow, not gravity circulation. The cylinder stat is connected up as before. It needs an electricity supply from the central heating circuit (but not switched by a programmer). You provide a mains pressure water feed, and out comes mains pressure water the other end. All the complex feed and venting arrangements and loft tanks can be removed, making it ideal for showers in loft conversions, which are impossible to feed using gravity fed systems.
If you convert the hot water to mains pressure, you should do the same for your cold taps. Otherwise, your mixers (i.e. showers) will be unbalanced and difficult to control. Also, people might be disturbed if the basin or bath taps get a trickle from the cold tap and a torrent from the hot tap.
Before you consider this, you must be sure that your mains water supply is good so that you get good flow and pressure at your kitchen tap.
Christian.
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On Mon, 29 Sep 2003 13:29:17 +0100, "Christian McArdle"

It would still be subject to part L1 requirements, I suspect. Considering that the water is stored at 75-80 degrees as opposed to 60, for a given amount of insulation the heat loss would be higher as well....
.andy
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But then, it stores more heat. The losses due to temperature difference will be approximately proportional to the temperature rise.
Losses due to the larger cylinder at lower temperature will be approximately sqrt x in nature assuming a sphere, which is better. However, most cylinders maintain a constant diameter (450mm) and vary in height. This then puts the capacity vs loss curve back towards a linear footing.
In all, I suspect a heat bank of similar thermal capacity is probably fractionally worse than an equivalent cylinder. However, modern insulation means this is easily good enough.
In any case, I'm sure it would be subject to Part L1. At least, I would hope so.
Christian.
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Negative head pump (ask Google)
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