Projected lifespan of pushfix plumbing?

Do manufacturers quote mean time to failure of pushfit plumbing? I'm trying to decide whether to do some re-plumbing using trad methods or some more of this new new fangled stuff.
Peter.
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Peter wrote:

In the larger B&Qs they have a least 3 ranges of pushfit. The quoted life span is up to 50 years. Thats for the Equator range the others are 25-30years
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So reckon on ten to be safe!
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geoff

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Upto?? Then why would one buy this stuff?
Regards, NT
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|Doncaster, UK http://www.hepworthplumbing.co.uk |DN12 1BY
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Hi
It seems crazy to me to save an hours work and fit something that may flood the place 20 years later. I wouldn't touch it myself.
The future can seem a long way off, but it comes anyway. Imagine if you'd fitted pushfit in 1972, thinking 'millennium? hah' and now got flooded from it. Not for me thanks.
Proper pipework fittings are a) known to work well from experience b) have a very long life c) are a bit more work, but not much.
Some things are no big if they fail, but plumbing has consequences out of all proportion to its cost.
Regards, NT
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     snipped-for-privacy@meeow.co.uk (N. Thornton) writes:

I'd be dubious about the longevity of the o-ring seal. Normally, I see up to perhaps ~20 years life of those in similar circumstances.

d) need [more] skilled workforce to correctly assemble. This is the big one -- plumbers have become impossible to get hold of. (A friend having an extension built has been told by the builder that he will not be able to get a plumber to do the plumbine parts, due to extremely short supply.) A less skilled workforce can probably do a more reliable pushfit installation than they could a soldered copper one.
Personally, as my DIY time is free and I can do soldered copper fittings without any problems, that is what I use. However, I can see a market for pushfit.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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On 29 Sep 2003 12:21:06 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

I use pushfit because I'm crap at soldering and haven't got the time and resource to practice until I'm any good - most often a job needs to be done NOW, like today when I unscrewed a floorboard and discovered that a year ago I'd managed to screw into the cold water pipe that feeds the bath :)
As an aside I was in the local plumbers merchants for another reason (bloody 1 1/4" waste on the bath innit) and noticed ALL the current plumbing products, even Kuterlite and Yorkshire, were guaranteed for 25 years. Doesn't that drop us into a swings/roundabouts scenario?
cheers
witchy/binarydinosaurs
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Andrew Gabriel wrote:

The time-cost justifications change when you are getting paid a fixed price to do the job. 20 years would be quite enough to get me out of the house and paid 8-).
--
Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
The FAQ for uk.diy is at www.diyfaq.org.uk
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snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote in message (N. Thornton) writes:

Yup, tho compression would be as easy as pushfit, skill wise. A compressed metal ring should last way better than a rubber washer.

Me too, but once you understand the ins and outs of it I still can't see a reason to choose it. I suspect it may become one of those no-nos like aluminium wiring. They seemed like a good idea at the time, but with a bit more thought we could have avoided them. I can see plumbers in 30 years saying 'pushfit? well you'll need that replumbed for your insurance to be valid'
Having said that, pushfit used for external downpipes shouldn't matter too much if they leak.
Regards, NT
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snipped-for-privacy@meeow.co.uk says...

I tend to agree. What the makers seem to be saying is it has roughly the same lifespan as elctrical wiring (give or take a decade or 2). Thus in future having a house re-plumbed for insurance purposes will be as standard a proceeedure as re-wireing is now.
I think i'll carry on doing what I'm doing now - use pushfit when in a hurry on easily accessable areas and copper when doing a proper job.
Thanks to everybody for their contributions.
Peter.
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If Mr or Ms Hep can provide a) independant data that shows pushfit to be as reliable as solder, solvent and compression and b) a 50 year guarantee that covers damage to the house and will still be genuinely claimable on in 50 years time
then I might well be convinced.
Regards, NT
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Has anyone seen a guarantee for Bosswhite and Hemp or CAF joints? I think there is just as much chance if not more that EPDM seals will be around and giving good service for longer than Hemp or other fibres
YMMV
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John wrote:

Organic rubber degrades after 30 years or so. Butyls are probably good for longer.
Thats what the pipes and O-rings are made off.

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Pushfit has been in use for 25yrs, probably longer in fact, how long do you want to wait before it proves itself? The only plumbing damage I've had was caused by pinpricks in copper pipe, probably thin imported stuff, and leaking compression joints, do you want to hang on while I look for the guarantee that covered them? Do you know of any plumbing related materials and devices i.e boilers, radiators, appliances etc., that have a guarantee that covers damage to the house if they fail?
--
David

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David @chapellllhouse.demon.co.uk wrote in message

I didn't know that.

I dont know. How long does soldered copper piping last? How long do compression fittings last? How long does pushfit last? I dont have any definitive answers to those qs, but I would expect [on a gut level only] that synthetic rubber seals are unlikely to last as well as solder or copper olives. I'd be perfectly happy to be proved wrong on that.

No, and thats just why I am still at this point wary of installing something that I expect to fail some day, with, in this case, possibly rather damaging consequences.
If someone actually has hard data I'd love to see it. After all, its perfectly possible that pushfit could turn out to be more reliable than the others. Until I have more info tho, I'd prefer to avoid it.
Regards, NT
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