Private Water Supply

Hi all
I have moved to a small farm that has an unused borehole.
All the kit seems to be in place ie pump etc, but even an untrained eye like mine can tell it is need of a good servicing and bits and pieces will need replacing.
So before I end up poisoning the whole familly I thought I'd better get a professional to come and check it out (yeah I know this is a diy NG but after masses of googling I'm none the wiser!
So the question is, who do I get to check it out ? I am guessing it is a bit speacialist for the local plumber, and given the potential health implications I don't want a bodge job.
Any ideas/info very greatly appreaciated.
Cheers
Charlie
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Try your local yellow pages, well borers & sinkers.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmaildot.com says...

A key thing is whether the water down there in the rock needs any mineral deposits filtering out? If so then if a filter is fitted is it still effective?
So, you need to test the water composition. You local environmental health department can do this if you can wait or they may be able to advise you of a private company that can do the work. We were quoted around 120 IIRC for a full test.
Colin
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Hi Charlie,
Have a look here:
http://www.briodydrilling.com /
and click through to the " Preventing Pollution of wells " section for a very interesting read. In fact the whole site has good advice on this type of project.
--
BigWallop

http://basecuritysystems.no-ip.com
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Charlieb wrote:

I've used <http://www.eclipsescientific.co.uk/ for chem and bio analysis, and they're very good.
They'll send you bottles, you fill them up and send them back.
--
Grunff


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Charlieb wrote:

Environmental Health Dept. of your local friendly council? Even if they can't/won't do the check themselves they should be able to advise you.

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Charlieb wrote:

I had one ofthese - best water ever. Man from d of H used to come rpund every so often to check the water quailty - p[robably worth getting in touch with district councl and asking them who does it...
The pump and suchlike was a simple affair - float valve in the header tank, and simple mains operated (CH type) pump. It didn't have to lift it too far - if the hole is deep you need to stick pump down it to pump upwards, raher than suck upwards.
Worth doing IMHO if the hole is into soft water.

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On a related subject, I have a natural spring on my land which just comes up into the soil forming a bog, which then drains into a stream. I've been wondering whether its possible and practical to try and tap this somehow to provide a water supply (this area of land has no mains supply). Searching on the net has not located anything relevant. Anyone any ideas/ experience?
Graham
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Any views expressed are not necessarily those of my employer

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Have you tried the Centre for Alternative Technology (if that's their proper name)? I think they're in Wales somewhere.
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http://www.cat.org.uk /
Machynlleth. Not too far from Aberystwyth. Not sure that they have that particular expertise though, but do try the website, and if you can, pay a visit to the centre; it's a great day out.
Hwyl!
M.
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Martin Angove (it's Cornish for "Smith") - ARM/Digital SA110 RPC
See the Aber Valley -- http://www.tridwr.demon.co.uk/abervalley.html
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On Thu, 17 Jul 2003 11:58:02 +0100, Graham Anstey

There were three systems on the estate where I worked for 20+ years, only the diesel powered one was in use when I started and this was abandoned in favour of mains water.
However the older two systems with ram pumps still functioned although abandoned. They seemed simple, a herring bone pattern of tile drains gathered into a 1.2m square cistern, from this a 100mm cast or clay pipe ran the water about 20m through a 3m drop to another brick lined chamber with the ram in it. A 3/4" galvanised water pipe then (originally) took the high pressure water 200m into the loft of the house, this contained a 1700gallon tank. It was the insurers concerns about the weight of this plus the poor capacity for fire fighting that forced the use of mains water.
AJH
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It may not just be a case of getting the water tested and the machinery tested. Take a look here for some good basic advice www.briodydrilling.com and also ask your local council's environmental health depatment for advice specific to your area.
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It may be unused for some very good reason such as unaccepteble levels of some contaminant. Can you not trace back and find someone who knows a bit about its history?

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need
A bit more info such as the details off a data badge would be a great help in identifying what we are talking about here. Monopumps for instance make down the hole borehole pumps which operate on the end of a long shaft within the water pipe and the gland and motor are at the top of the well at ground level. A Google search for monopumps would assist you if it is a mono version.

A competent maintenance engineer would be able to take care of the mechanical side for you but the water testing will require a bit of biochemistry and you should have a look in your local yellow pages. Alternatively as a very rough and ready quick check that the water isn't poisonous give some to your neighbours dog<g> If it dies don't waste money on a full health test

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Thanks everyone for all that info
Certainly given me a lot to go on
It is the type where the pump is submerged down the borehole, there is some sort of what looks like sand filter and a big tank with a diapraghm in it to give the pressure.
Charlie

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Hello Charlieb

Best plan, I'd get a professional in too, and I've had such a system. If you've also got local drainage you'll save a lot of money as long as it doesn't cost a fortune to get it working well again.

Borers not only drill, but also commission and test. (Usually...)

Requires a fair amount of testing to figure out what sort of water it is. Then it could be as little as an ultraviolet filter and a small electric pump and holder tank.
Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK uk.d-i-y FAQ: http://www.diyfaq.org.uk /
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