Power sockets in brick shed

I currently have a fused spur from the kitchen ring (cooker is on separate connection) to a brick shed. We currently have two fridge/freezers in there and a tumble dryer.
I also plug power tools in and everything is fine.
What I want to know is can I replace the single socket in the shed with 4 sockets. I am not going to be using any more than I already do, it's just for convenience (converting it to a woodworking workshop, so it would be nice to have power sockets for my power tools, but I'll only be using one at a time).
As it's on a fused spur I guess it would be OK as the fuse will protect the total of the shed's usage to 13A and therefore all cables are protected.
Am I right?
If anyone suggests running a separate ring from the consumer box please clarify whether I NEED to do it or if it would be NEATER. The consumer box is all the way through the kitchen and my study, so I'd rather not do this unless I have to.
Thanks,
Andy
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The quick answer is yes. A fused spur can run multiple sockets as the total load is limited to 13A by the fuse.
The slow answer is that just having a fused spur from the kitchen in a shed might not be a good idea. It is much better to run proper armoured cable from a separate circuit to outbuildings. Then it is possible to have better discrimination, seperate RCD to the house, and more reliable earthing. It is better to run a radial than a ring in this situation.
If you don't wish to do this, and I can see why you might not, ensure that the kitchen ring is protected by a 30mA RCD. If it isn't, replace the FCU with one that incorporates a 30mA RCD that will protect the outside wiring. These are widely available. Ensure that you have an IP66 style socket on the outside of your shed to plug the lawnmower into and you might just get away regs wise without a kitchen ring RCD claiming that the kitchen sockets are unlikely to be used for outside equipment when a more convenient dedicated socket is provided for this express purpose. Better to replace your kitchen MCB with an RCBO, though.
Christian.
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On Wed, 30 Jul 2003 15:29:38 +0000, usene wrote:

Great.
That's for earth faults isn't it. We have a Flymo powerbreaker for the lawnmower, but the rest of the circuit isn't protected.
I take it it would be wise protecting it with an RCD in the shed as the power comes in?
Cheers,
Andy
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don't want them left off while you're away if the RCD happens to trip.
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On Wed, 30 Jul 2003 19:38:36 +0000, usene wrote:

Good point. OK, so I'll split it upon entry in to a set of power sockets for the fridges and a set for woodworking/tumble dryer protected by an RCD.
Cheers,
Andy
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The problem is that the earthing might not be good enough to do this. You'll probably have to either use an RCD to cover everything (a 100mA Type S would do, with a 30mA instant on the "RCD" rings which will discriminate), or upgrade the earthing arrangements. In particular, if you have any plumbing, or structural metalwork (i.e. the roof) in the building, you should really main bond it back to the house CU with really substantial cable. This cable has to have no breaks or junction boxes on the way.
Christian.
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On Wed, 30 Jul 2003 18:17:55 +0100, Nigel Mercier

He can do what he likes regardless of the regs anyway - they are not a legal requirement, despite the implication that they might be.
Only a fool would choose not to adopt the wiring regs though. Reason being if the electrical work results in an unfortunate event then the regs will tend to be used in an advisory capacity to apportion blame. An insurance company could choose to hide behind failure to comply with the regs as a means to avoid paying out.
Andrew
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to an attached building?
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You also need to consider the expected loading. I would say a tumble drier and two fridge/freezers alone should be considered somewhere near, if not at that limit. Check the rating plates.

Incorrect. It may not be the best thing, but is allowed in the regs.

Correct. The FCU is normally a 2p isolator.
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Andrew Gabriel
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On Wed, 30 Jul 2003 23:05:14 +0000, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

I won't be using them all at the same time. The F/Fs will be on all the time, but I certainly won't be using the tumble dryer at the same time as the tools (no way I'm woodworking in there in that heat!).
Cheers,
Andy
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