Plan B: Ceramic Tile Effect Flooring

I've seen this stuff in the sheds and visited a friends house where this stuff had been fitted when he had his place refurbished. He didn't DIY so I get no feedback about the pros and cons of fitting etc.
An example can be found here: http://www.diy.com/bq/product/product.jhtml?PRODID 6504&paintCatId=&CATID6373&maxBullets9
I'm thinking of using it in the kitchen (I will be replacing the skirting also, so no beading) . The existing kitchen floor is a little uneven, currently finished with real teak parquet "tiles" originally laid with bitumen. I was going to sand the existing floor then lime wash it [or something] and seal it, (Plan A,) which will be a lot cheaper than buying in a new one, but I like the look of this stuff and it will lighten the room considerably.
Comments and such appreciated, particularly from anyone who has had any experience with this stuff... Or do I save a lot of cash and stay with Plan A?
TIA
--
Jet
(Plan A sounds good to me, but I'm not SWMBO)
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Jet wrote:

Briefly considered it, before opting for real tiles, but I think it seems good for a quick, easy and inexpensive project. In the same shed, you may find they have used it around the display kitchens and bathrooms. In our local it appears to be wearing extremely well, might be worth a quick look next time.

Ah a real teak floor, lovely stuff, if a bit of a pain sometimes. Certainly does not like moisture, edges, radiator pipes etc. and loose blocks are a literal pain for stubbing toes on. It would be a shame to remove or cover it, but I feel it comes down to a style decision. Teak parquet won't really take lime wash to a great extent and is a bit unusual in a kitchen.
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Toby.

'One day son, all this will be finished'
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Good idea! next time im I'n the sheds, I'll keep my eyes on the floor ;)

Certainly
really
Yeah I like having a real wood floor, but imho the wrong choice for the kitchen. Then again, if you saw some of the handywork of the previous occupant, you would understand the logic employed (erm, maybe not... still looking for some logic in his decisions re: diy 3 years down the line). I want if possible to lighten the overall feel of the room as the only window faces a brick wall. I have another window to install, but that probably be until Spring with one thing and another.
Thanks for the input Toby
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Jet



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"Jet" wrote | The existing kitchen floor is a little uneven, currently finished | with real teak parquet "tiles" originally laid with bitumen.
Do you know how much estate agents will salivate over a Period Feature like real teak parquet?
| I was going to sand the existing floor then lime wash it [or something] | and seal it, (Plan A,) which will be a lot cheaper than buying in a new | one,
I'd go for Plan A (without the limewash) and if you want a lighter effect do something to the unit doors (or install more lightbulbs)
Owain
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I
http://www.diy.com/bq/product/product.jhtml?PRODID 6504&paintCatId=&CATID166373&maxBullets9
and
but
Plan
Amtico is the King of flooring effects, usually coming in squares. Another company do a similar range but half the cost. Well worth it, as it is very hard wearing. Amitco costs an arm and a leg.
The likes of Cushionfloor do effects in a lino type of material and also this is very good with the surface texture very realistic. When fitting Cushionfloor types watch out for when the tiled patterns obviously show it is not ceramics, when meeting walls and the likes (no cement effect against wall). A neighbour have wooden laminate flooring effect lino. You would not know the difference, except that when you walk on it, it is not hard and clickerty. The grain of the wood was even in the textured surface.
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http://www.diy.com/bq/product/product.jhtml?PRODID 6504&paintCatId=&CATID6373&maxBullets9
I used the slate version in girlfriend's flat.
Relatively easy to fit, (going down over uneven floor boards with 'cork' tiles on top of that), I would put a line of glue in the joints if doing it again, just to be sure.
Easy to cut (score the 'glaze' - type layer first, or on the 'down' stroke of the saw, (I used a standard rip saw over a jig saw for exposed cuts).
Good wearing properties... no scratches so far. (actually, there is one, where I dropped the new oven, but that's not really the floors fault).
Whatever you do... BUY A SPARE PACK. BnQ will take it back, no hassle, if you DON'T need it. I was 3 tiles short of finishing, and spent about 3 months driving / ringing around Greater London trying to find another pack.
My experiences only... one small kitchen...
M.
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