Petrol in Diesel Engine

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running
It isn't.
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Megane
a
not
easily
at
microseconds!
to go

move
puts
more -

Vectra's for one have had a cat since they first came out. Think Golf's (and their siblings) do as well.
--
Woody

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Dunno, I can't recall Brazilian cities being smog-free and they use quite a bit of ethanol to run cars. I suppose it's a good choice if used properly.
--
The wage of sin is death, but after the government has taken its share
all that is left is a tired feeling.
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Steve Firth wrote:

Its pretty much a fallacy. ANY IC engine is going to produce some NOx type compounds, and these are some of the worst smog generators. S0x is worse, but suphur can be removed from most fuels reasonably easily. (of course those who use sulphuirtc acid to remove dyes from 'red' diesel, and sell it on un refined to cheapskate Volvo owners are a different case)
If you go for lower temp combustion, you end up with lower cylinder pressures and less overall efficiency, so although NOx goes down, CO2 goes up..well you can turbo charge to get round THAT I suppose, but even so the efficiency is not all that good.
If you want a really clean burning engine, run it off liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen...and pray it doesn't go BOOM. :)
Of course the pollution generated in MAKING these is probably far higher, but heck, you can put your power plants in Brazil, so LA stays clean at least, and who cares about Brazilians anyway. :-)
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"Indy Cars" use methanol as a fuel. When it comes to racing there are also issues surrounding the safety of the fuel and the risk of spillages. The engines of such cars are specifically designed for the fuel in question and only intended to last to the end of the race. Which in the case of drag racing is measured in seconds.
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N. Thornton wrote:

A top fuel dragster will, if lucky, do about 5 x 5 second burns. Many fail spectacularly doing it. Most racers will only cane the engine enough to beat the other guy.
A normal racing engine - F1 say - will usually do 5-10 races before complete rebuild. Needless to say top teams with money to burn and drivers who just want to win will run the revs up higher, and break them quicker, so they usually get rebuilt pretty much every race.
Its not unlkown to see driver X with underfinanced team Y suddenly, at about tehtime he wants to ghet into a decent team, suddenly put on a performance that is way above what he normally delivers. The commentators say 'why can't he do that all teh time, he ust havbe been threatend with teh sack and wants to keep his place' Enlightened team owners to whom he has already had a chat will know that he has just RISKED the sack by taking his worn out old engine up to the redline to show what he COULD do in a decent car...:-)

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Michael McNeil) wrote in message

Illuminating details Michael. One more detail I could add is that at least one of the earliest horseles carriages had spring-return steering, such that the straightetning up of the wheels was effected only by a spring. Needless to say it failed to straighten up now and then...
Regards, NT
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The nearest to this would be a diesel-electric locomotive, but they use conventional diesel engines to drive generators.
The most common usage of gas turbines is aircraft, with some usage in ship propulsion.
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Which is how such engines are used in turbo-prop aircraft and helicopters.

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It means that the output of the engine changes after the throttle has been changed. Which isn't the kind of behaviour people expect from a car engine. (Possibly even those familiar with piloting jet aircraft would have problems driving a car which behaved in this way.)
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The latter. It can take up to 20 seconds for a turbofan to reach full power. This would not be good for overtaking. However, this is somewhat misleading.
The lag can be countered for by careful design of the transmission. This is because it is the acceleration of the components that takes time, not the variation in input power, which can be changed rapidly by varying fuel flow.
Power can be varied much more rapidly if the engine is allowed to rotate at constant speed. This enables their use in helicopters and provides much better control in turboprops, where power can be almost instananeously altered with the use of variable pitch (constant speed) propellors.
In a land vehicle application, the use of a variable speed transmission would have a similar effect. Instant acceleration would consist of rapidly increasing the fuel flow and adjusting the transmission to keep the engine at the constant speed (coordinated by a FADEC). Response to the throttle would be determined by the transmission's ability to immediately adjust ratio, not the response of the engine.
Obviously, total acceleration is limited by the total fuel flow that can be pumped into the engine. If this is exceeded (but ratio adjusted regardless), the engine will slow down. This could be beneficial, though. There would be some ability to get extra "overtaking" boost by accepting a certain LP shaft reduction. This might allow a smaller engine for the same application.
I think the real problems with turbine land vehicles would be cost, gyroscopic effects and safety considerations from the high energy contained in the rotating engine structure (uncontained engine failures, crash worthiness etc.).
Christian.
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Excuse my ignorance, but how does all this relate to Mazda's rotary car engine?
Peter
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Peter Ashby
School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Scotland
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On Sat, 23 Aug 2003 23:33:39 +0100, Mark Evans wrote:

Doesn't seem to worry buses in China, they have huge tanks on the roof. This water is required for the brakes, they fill the tanks before starting the longer decents on the road between Lijiang and Chengdu. How much water do you need to inject? Could it be emulsified into the fuel, perhaps at the pump? Or even simply added in the correct proportion at the pump into the fuel. The tank then having a lowest point take off for the water and a higher one for the fuel.
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Dave. pam is missing e-mail
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Years ago there was a gizmo you could buy (often offered in E&M) that fed steam into the air intake of the carb. It was a water bottle feeding down to a copper coil wound around the exhaust pipe, and then up to the air cleaner.
--
Tony Williams.

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On Sat, 16 Aug 2003 08:58:45 +0100, "harrogate"

Well any diesel I have driven, including BMW's finest., all felt like they had to be rowed along on the gearbox. The low end torque that is talked about never manifested itself in my presence.
What I really don't understand is why peoplr who buy diesel engined cars then procedd to drive the sh-one-t out of them. What are they trying to prove ?
And as for reliability. Diesel engines in boats were ultra-reliable until they started fitting turbo-chargers and letting them rev higher. Reliability went out the window, and if you really need an emetic try reading a repair estimate for a turbo charged Volvo diesel boat engine.
Paul Mc Cann
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On Sun, 17 Aug 2003 19:10:33 +0100, Paul Mc Cann

I drive a diesel Freelander which is really a tractor with a bit of fancy bodywork bolted on :)
A few weeks back I got to hire a Mondeo TDCi for a couple of days whilst my Freelander was in for servicing. I didn't check what was under the bonnet of the TDCi, but the thing went like lightning (comparitively to the Freelander) when I hoofed it. I thought "hell, these petrol engines sure put the diesel to shame!".
When I got home I got the user manual out. This thing I was giving credit to was a 2L diesel. Went like a steam train on steroids when you put the hammer down, plenty of grunt and really smooth.
The new TD4 Freelander is a lot better as well.
Andrew
Do you need a handyman service? Check out our web site at http://www.handymac.co.uk
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wrote:

Sad I know. An automotive engineer neighbour had one and sent it back as it was naff and broke down a lot.

You shold have drove the pretrol one then.

It can't get any worse can it?
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writes

No, it doesn't seem so, grammar and spelling both in the same sentence
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Perfect guv, perfect. Yer actual estuary Inglish.
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writes

Learn some - you need to
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geoff

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