Painting pads - appraisal

It took me a long time to overcome my resistance to using a roller rather than a brush. I now have walls without the vertical parallel marks where the emulsion partially dries out and the new application alongside refuses to 'feather in'. The downside is that the corners have to be cut in with a brush anyway.
Since my parenting has not yet finished (I have a nasty feeling it will NEVER end) :-( , I have been asked to go and help my son redecorate the house he has just purchased. I should like to ask if using paint pads is a good idea - what are the advantages and disadvantages - are there any tips which anyone can give me.
Thanx
--
Marcus

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I like them. It takes some minutes to get used to them, and to discover where paint might drip out and how to avoid that.
One big point (for me at least), make sure the handle of the pad is positioned such that your hand is exactly centred behind the pad. The more common ones have the handle coming from the rear centre of the pad and off to an angle, so there's no way you can get your hand centrally positioned. This means you have to use some extra wrist force to make up for your hand being non-centrally positioned behind the pad, and that's a lot more tiring if you are doing a lot.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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colour over a darker colour. I get a more even cover with a roller. But maybe my paint pad technique is lacking.
--
Tim Mitchell

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Marcus wrote:

I'm afraid I don't like these things. I've never seen a decorater use one! However, it's "horses for courses"; you'll have to try, and see how you get on!
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The're great for water based paints. AFAIK the only way to get a decent finish with acrylic varnish. With emulsion a large pad will do large areas very quickly with very little of the spattering that I get with a roller, and even a big pad gets pretty close to the corners.
I wouldn't use them with oil based paints though.
Bill
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My parents always used pads and hated rollers, so I assumed there was a reason and followed suit. Then one day, I bought a roller, just to see. All the pads are now six feet under in a landfill, where they belong.
Another thing to consider is spraying, though. Very popular in the US, apparently. Haven't tried it yet, as most cheap spray guns are not for emulsion. I think there is the "SprayStation" which claims to do emulsion, but I haven't bought one yet. Does anyone know if it works?
Christian.
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Not used a spray gun myself, only to do car paint, but from what I see on TV there is a distinct skill to using them. At least i assume thats why all these DIY progs end up with such a patchy finish.
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That's a deliberate New Age pattern effect you know. Or is it feng shui?
Peter
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Peter Ashby
School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Scotland
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I've been told you need to (a) make sure the thing is moving before pulling the trigger, (b) make sure it is still moving when you let go and (c) put on lots of very thin coats.
Do you think this would be enough?
Christian.
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which sits over a bucket of paint, not the handheld things). Good for very uneven surfaces (like breeze blocks) but you get quite a bit of wayward airborne paint which dries in the air and settles like dust. You would only want to do it in an empty room. Fast though.
--
Tim Mitchell

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On Wed, 15 Oct 2003 11:47:26 +0100, Marcus

Pads are my tool of choice for emulsion onto artexed ceilings - a bit like a brush, you stroke the paint on in different directions, and it covers rather well.
Did not get on particularly well on vertical surfaces.
Drips are quite a problem, so if the house has carpetted floors you definitely will need plastic sheets over the carpet.
Finish off corners with a 1in brush or similar.
PoP
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Each to his own, but I much prefer pads over rollers (we're talking about emulsioning I presume?) I find I get a smoother finish, and less drips. Also gets very close in to corners. I think they are easier to clean afterwards too.
But SWMBO swears by her roller, so I dunno. Suck it and see!
David
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My limited experience is that pads absorb a huge amount of paint. This is acceptable for water based paints, but cleaning an oil based paint off a pad would need pints of spirit.
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