Painting on top of dark emulsion

What's the best approach for painting a light emulsion onto a previously emulsioned surface which is dark in colour? I have a feeling that the dark colour will "bleed" through the new emulsion.
Obviously a couple of coats of the lighter colour is one option, but are there "undercoat" products which can block the original underlying colour?
PoP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can get stuff in a decorators merchant specially for blocking out dark colours Stuart ---------
Remove YOURPANTS before E-mailing Me
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 14 Nov 2003 20:43:51 +0000, Stuart

Thanks - will do that in the morning.
PoP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
2 coats of the new color, else the new will simply have to cover the undercoat.
IMHO the B&Q own brand paint covers well.
Rick

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Started this job today. One coat has left the old colour bleeding through very heavily. Second coat will most likely improve the situation. But it certainly looks likely that a third coat will be required on this situation.
PoP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We've used one coat of a good *white* emulsion, or two coats of cheap B&Q ones.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The opacity of the more expensive paints is due to it having more titanium oxides than cheaper stuff.
Also a tip I heard some time ago is to put a little of the dark colour in the new paint. I don't know why it works, melding the grins perhaps. I don't know if has to be the exact shade either but I doubt that.
Sometimes a completely different dark colour will do it. If you wanted to get rid of a strong red, a grey coat might be the first option for example, then white or whatever on the grey.
--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hi. Just paint over it, simple as that. The only complications are you will need 1 or 2 more coats, and if the new paint is _really_ crap it'll be hard to cover the old colour fully. But its rare you get paint that bad.
Regards, NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 16 Nov 2003 12:27:31 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@meeow.co.uk (N. Thornton) wrote:

Job is now finished - it took 4 full coats in all before the underlying dark blue finally disappeared.
Maybe I could have loaded an earlier coat a bit thicker, however I didn't feel that was a good idea otherwise I may have got the paint sagging/running.
PoP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.