Painting a bathroom

Hi Everyone,
Well, I'm at the painting & tiling stage of redecorating the bathroom. I've put two coats of undercoat on the newly plastered walls and three on the ceiling as advised by the plasterer, so now for a bit of colour. But, my local paint supplier has refused to sell me bathroom specific paint on the grounds its a con, so far his advice (and price) has been spot on, but I just want to check what sort of paint is suitable (all the areas prone to splashing will be tiled).
Cheers,
Jeff
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I've
Did he say why it was a con? We used some Homebase stuff which is certainly different from your average emulsion - plastic in it and it seems to form a water resistant finish. Only problem I can see is that it sticks together too well and you can peel it off in strips if you are making minor changes.
HTH Dave R
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I was thinking it might be a con too. Normal emulsion is cheaper and easier to apply.
The special bathroom stuff might have better wearing qualities in a splashy environment I suppose. I ask myself whether I've ever had a problem with the lifetime of bathroom paint ... no.
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I doubt its a con - bathroom/kitchen paints do appear to be more plastic-coated when dried. I've rubbed a painted wall with a damp cloth before to try and clean something off and found the cloth go the colour of the paint slightly. Done this with a room painted with bathroom paint and nothing came off - almost like its waterproof.
However - I suspect that most paints will be okay - as long as they don't get wet for long periods - the question is possibly how wet/humid the room gets. If you often get condensation on the walls, and it doesn't dry out quickly, then there may be a problem.
D
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On Thu, 18 Sep 2003 17:21:40 +0100, "David Hearn"
<snip>

Agreed - not Bathroom but our experience has been with Kitchen where we used to get severe mould in areas where there was condensation and little ventilation - corners near the floor on outside walls. Special kitchen paint (Wickes) has eliminated the problem completely - but it is tricky to put on - seem to remember if you over-roll it, it can lift off again - so we used two or three thin coats.
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As far as I can tell after using both, Dulux smooth exterior masonry paint and Dulux bathroom/kitchen paint seem to be remarkably similar. They both set to a smooth "plasticcy" finish that resists water and mould but the bathroom paint is (IIRC) about twice the price.
Asher.
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asher http://domestic1.sjc.ox.ac.uk/~ahoskins /
asher AT crumbly DOT
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