OT ? Integrated kitchen appliances

We have a fairly modern, yet poorly planned kitchen (installed by previous owner). There is no room for anything else but a washing machine, but their are lots of spare cupboards, including a floor to ceiling unit (for a fridge?). We want to replace our existing appliances with integrated ones, are units with integrated appliances any different to standard kitchen units? (will new appliances fit straight into my existing cupboards), Can I modify existing doors do fit, for example, an integrated dishwasher?
Thanks in advance
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OK, my experience is the following:
1. Fridges/freezers: These can be inserted in standard kitchen cupboards, but the cupboards may require modification. The width of the appliance is usually about 56cm, which gives enough space inside a standard 600mm wide cupboard to slide past the outside door hinges. The cupboard will usually need modification as you need to remove the larder unit shelving and ensure a top shelf is in exactly the right position. Also, the fridge freezer must be chosen wisely to ensure that the fridge/freezer split is at the same height as the split in the preexisting doors. Do not consider connecting the doors so that both the fridge and freezer open simultaneously in order to get past split matching problems. This will result in excessive force being required to open, possibly snapped or twisted connectors and your freezer icing up. The door split issue obviously doesn't arise with single fridges or freezers. Even a tall larder fridge requiring two doors is OK, as it can have the doors connected with strips in this case.
2. Dishwashers: These do NOT require a unit. They require an exact 600mm hole. This can be obtained by entirely removing a 600 cabinet and retaining the door. The door attaches to the front of the machine using fixings that come with the machine. The door choice is important. A semi-integrated needs a drawerline door. A fully integrated needs a drawerline door AND a drawer front. If you can't source new doors, this means that you should remove a drawerline unit. The two parts of the door should be connected together with metal connecting strips, which can be obtained from B&Q. Using a full height door is rarely aesthetically or practically successful, as the handle needs to be at the top.
3. Washing machines/tumble dryers: These also do not require a unit, but require an exact 600mm cabinet space.. They require full height 600mm doors (although connected drawerline+drawer front, might work if you check hinge cutout requirements). The doors connect to hinges that come with the appliance. The drill holes required in the doors rarely match those preexisting in the door. You will, therefore, need a special drill bit to attach the hinges. Tumble dryers tend to be very deep. If your worksurface is only 600mm deep, then there is little space for plumbing or sockets behind it. Choose location wisely. With 650mm deep worksurfaces, there's no worries.
Christian.
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Integrated fridge's are normally 540mm wide, inside of most carcasses is 600-36[2x18]V4
hinge is normally 20mm
So it is a pretty snug fit.
I totally agree with the rest of Christians post
--
regards
Dave Batter
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Whoops. Of course I meant 54cm. ;-)
Christian.
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I should also mention that the design of the back of the larder unit is critical. If it has a hardboard back, then this may have to be removed, as it is likely to be at a position less deep than the appliance. The same goes for any struts which aren't right at the back of the unit.
Christian.
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