OT aircraft registration lettering - size?

anyone know if there's a regulation size for registration letters on aircraft- helicopters in particular?
Any reasoning behind it?
TIA
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Jim K


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On 2016-07-15, jim <k> wrote:

anyone know if there's a regulation size for registration letters

A bloke at the CAA told me that if you could read the registration letters on an aircraft with the naked eye, it was too low.
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On 15-Jul-16 6:04 PM, jim wrote:

Set out, in detail, in CAP523.
http://publicapps.caa.co.uk/docs/33/CAP523.PDF
In brief, underside markings must be at least 50cm high. Side markings must be at least 30cm high.
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On Fri, 15 Jul 2016 18:48:17 +0100 (GMT+01:00), jim <k> wrote:

If you know the registration and it is fitted with an Automatic dependent surveillance – broadcast (ADS-B) transmitter as many light helicopters/aircraft are then you should be able to enter the registration into one of a number of flight tracking sites such as planefinder.net and look at the time it was observed. Height and track data should be visible.
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On 24/07/2016 17:52, Peter Parry wrote:

In several thousand flying hours I have only flown one or two small aircraft types that were transmitting and receiving ADS-B data. What's your reference for "many"?
Most aircraft will be squawking "mode Charlie" and "mode Alpha" - this means that the transponder will be responding to SSR (secondary surveillance radar) scans by transmitting the flight level (approximately equivalent to altitude) in addition to a four digit assigned or conspicuity code. Quite a few aircraft now have mode Sierra transponders and these will allow more information (including a unique identification number) to be transmitted, in addition to supporting mode Alpha and Charlie. The transponder data will only appear on the flight tracking sites if there is line of sight between the aircraft and the SSR head, which is far from guaranteed if the OP was concerned about it being closer than 500ft. If transponder-based info is available from SSR data the OP would need to know the QNH (sea-level atmospheric pressure) at the time and location of interest in order to be able to convert the flight level to an altitude and then to subtract the ground elevation to give an estimate of height. Finally, the mode Charlie info will, almost certainly, be unverified. This whole thing has far too many holes to be of any use to the OP. It would be far more effective and easier to find the owner/operator details from the CAA's G-INFO site and to have a chat with them, as I suggested at the outset.
Apologies for the jargon and lengthy explanation, but I hope it will be of interest to someone. Now to get back to today's DIY project: building a dwarf brick wall in the garden.
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On Mon, 25 Jul 2016 11:48:17 +0100, snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

The use of ADS-B out in general aviation is increasing following the recent (and ongoing) NATS trial of integrating non-certified GPS receivers to allow broadcasting of position via ADS-B.
A look at any of the flight tracking sites will show increasing numbers of GA and gliders showing up.
Interestingly the coverage of the world by amateur receivers picking up and sharing ADS-B out data and sharing it via sites such as flight radar makes their coverage far better than that from formal services such as the National Air Traffic Service. NATS ADSB coverage in the UK stops at about Manchester and the Welsh border, the amateur stations cover all of the UK from Shetlands to Jersey.

Mode S uses the wonderfully named extended squitter to allow the aircraft to broadcast ADS-B information without the need for a secondary surveillance radar interrogation.

ADS-B broadcasts both barometric and geometric altitude (height of the aircraft above the earth ellipsoid), the latter from GPS. At most they would need to know their own height although it seems some of the flight plotting sites either correct for terrain or use corrected data (If you watch an aircraft landing the altitude at the threshold is about 0ft).
The following should produce track information for now (13:37, Mon 25th) :-
G-TUNE Robinson R22 G-ROYM Robinson R44 MINI Glider G-BNSN Cessna 152
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On Mon, 25 Jul 2016 14:43:14 +0100, snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

Oh yes :-) except you don't get to see the planes. the receivers are now quite cheap or given away by flight tracking web sites to improve their coverage. The receiver RF bit alone (on a USB stick) is about £15.
People leave them running 24/7 feeding data to a central server. There are a few Raspberry Pi based designs as well, eg http://www.satsignal.eu/raspberry-pi/dump1090.html
In the US ipad based solutions are popular with GA pilots :-
http://ipadpilotnews.com/2016/01/ads-b-traffic-101-2/ http://ipadpilotnews.com/2015/10/ads-b-receiver-buy-2/
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I'm feeding fr24 from a Raspberry Pi B+ with a USB dongle (£8 on eBay) and an antenna made from one metre of copper wire. I'm uploading details of approx 2000 flights per day (I'm in south Hampshire). I see A LOT of gliders and small private planes. BTW the "payment" for feeding fr24 is a business subscription worth $499 pa.
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wrote:

There's a very similar system for ships, AIS http://tinyurl.com/hmbrvqd I have a small commercial dedicated VHF receiver feeding a commercial application on my computer (ShipPlotter) via USB, which as well as displaying the signals locally, re-transmits the data to the Uni. of the Aegean, for re-display internationally (http://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ais/home/ ) It runs 24/7. Being VHF, reception is nominally limited to LOS, but given the right weather conditions, I can receive from vessels as far as Spain. AIUI a satellite system is now available that allows tracking of vessels in mid-ocean.
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In fact when i get a moment or two we're going to put them on two of our radio comms sites which will give an excellent range and coverage. Most all of the aircraft over our place thats in line to a local airport runway have them now excepting some older vintage planes...
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Tony Sayer




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