Oil Stones?

Just a quickie, Anyone know if you can still get the old style oil stones (usually in a wooden box), for sharpening chisels etc; looks like a block of slate in a wooden box. Mine (which I inherited) is getting somewhat worn and is starting to show it's age (just like me!). I have tried some more modern dry sharpening stones, but nothing has yet come anywhere near the edge you get with an old style oil stone.
TIA
Martin.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Search for product 'oilstone' in www.screwfix.com
Product no: 12048 Price: 4.99 inc. VAT
This should open webpage:
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/sea/searchresults.jsp ;jsessionid=1VXOOJZJ0SXH1CJO2C4CJ0Q?_dyncharset=UTF-8&q=oilstone&n=&pn=1&pd=1&pi=1&cn=1&cd=1&x=8&y10
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

To ensure a high quality of stone, make sure it is an "India stone". Ordinary oil stones will quickly wear out.
Try http://www.axminster.co.uk/default.asp and search for "India". They have more than one on offer.
--
Howard Neil



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 30 Nov 2003 18:35:49 +0000 (UTC), "Martin"

I'm intrigued by your comment about the old one being worn.
If it is just dished it can be flattened with either silicin carbide grains on a flat surface (plate glass would do) or with wet and dry abrasive paper . (Again plate glass can act as a sub strate)
If you have managed to wear it out you must be a hevay user.;-)
I find water stones the best to use in a workshop environment for things like wood chisels Quick cutting and easily flattened
Paul Mc Cann
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

What makes a "water stone" a "water stone"? Is there any reason why an "oilstone" shouldn't be used with water instead (from new *before* it ever gets any oil near it, of course!) ?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 30 Nov 2003 23:45:50 -0000, "Mike Faithfull"

Not sure if this directly answers your question, but I was under the impression that a stone could be either water or oil - but not both:
http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/byform/mailing-lists/bookarts/2001/06/msg00126.html
PoP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 30 Nov 2003 23:45:50 -0000, "Mike Faithfull"

I should have been more explicit. I meant Japanese water stone. They are softer tham Western oil stones, cut quicker but also wear quicker. They are very easy to flatten
Paul Mc Cann
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip>

The one I'm currently using is (as near as I can tell) well over 50 years old; I inherited it from my Grandfather. And, yes it is somewhat dished in the centre; I wasn't *aware* they could be re-flattened.
Martin.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.