oil filled heater

Greetings
My utility room used to house a conventional floor boiler and the heat even from the pilot kept the small room at a reasonable temperature, so that the wife could dry clothes on a ceiling rack. However, since removing the boiler (new Vailent condenser in upstairs room) the utility is very cold, and I would like to install some form of heater to keep the temperature reasonable and the clothes drying. I do not want any incandescant wall electric heater because the room layout could result in clothes falling from the rack onto the heater. I have been told that oil filled heaters, although electrically powered, have no exposed incandescent element. Has anyone any experience of using this sort of heater? It would be in use for maybe 10 - 12 hours each day.
TIA
ZD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Zipadee Doodar wrote:

I really, really doubt that. The pilot light would have outputted a few Watts max - this is not enough to keep a tiny cupboard warm, never mind a whole room.
More likely you were experiencing the overall heat leaked from the boiler when it's firing, which could amount to a couple of hundred Watts.
> I have been told that oil filled heaters, although

Yes, they work pretty well, and would do what you want. Alternatively, consider an electric towel rail. This would give you up to say 400W output, and some rails to hand stuff on.
--
Grunff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, your probably correct. I suspect that the firing periods and retained heat did the drying, but some of the heat was obviosly retained during the off periods and kept the room frost free. At the moment, I store my beer in there because its colder than the fridge.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

hand and face washing, all through the summer, the heating is off and only the pilot light is running.
There's no other source of heat; lots of people, (well, one) have said the same as you, but it is really true
mike r
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mike ring wrote:

That's different. 10W in a well insulated boiler will cause the heat exchanger to reach maybe 35-40C over a few hours. When you pull water through it, you use up some of the energy stored in the heat exchanger to heat the water.
Do this simple experiment - run the hot water with your boiler turned off (but the pilot on). You'll get a few minutes worth of warm water (measure the temperature - that would be interesting to know), then it will go cold.
--
Grunff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I didn't realise it was all that different, perhaps it is, I've only got my own experience to go on, and my hovel hasn't got a utility room! Most people do tell me it's cobblers, so I'm a bit surprised at you (old septic) accepting it

I do it all through the summer; I've never tried measurements but it's nice and comfy for ablutions; you'll have to wait for the heating to be no longer required to get a proper scientific answer! But I imagine I get a pretty large bulk of lukewarm water for the weekly facewash
mike r
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 27 Jan 2004 21:52:25 -0000, "Zipadee Doodar"

Could you not plumb in a small radiator? An electric heater is going to cost a fair bit to run. You might even find that the incremental cost wipes out a significant part of the condensing boiler saving......
.andy
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Is there any way you can run just a piece of pipe, say 22mm, along the length of the room, maybe at floor level ? This could be connected at each end to some 10mm to 22mm reducers and would let the small room have a little bit of heat from the rest of the system. Just like a small unobtrusive radiator really.
--
http://www.basecuritysystems.no-ip.com

Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 07:12:07 GMT, BigWallop wrote:

Adding a "radiator" from the house heating system seems like the best approach to me. As someone else said running an electric heater for the times mentioned is quite liekly to eat any of the savings the new boiler generates.
This length of pipe would need at least one valve somewhere so that the flow through can be controlled otherwise it might seriously unbalance the system.
--
Cheers snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com
Dave. pam is missing e-mail
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.