New roof; slate or tiled

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I have a mid terraced house & I've finally convinced myslef to get a new roof.
Either, I can have the slate removed, the roof felted and reslated, thereby having a quality slate roof, *but there'll be a join either side*. Or I can get it tiled, interlocking with the neighbours' roofs and having no joins.
Which do people think is best?
Tony
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The roof style may have to be to your local authority requirements. Some councils will not allow certain types in certain areas. Best talk to your roofer.
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This only applies to Listed Buildings or in if it's in a Conservation Area etc. As the adjoining houses are both tiled already I can't see this being a problem.
If they are the original natural slates it might be possible to reuse them, but this depends on the condition and the size of the nail holes - you won't know for sure until you strip the roof. If you want to use new natural slates you'll need deep pockets. Or you could use Eternit or similar artificial slates.
Tiling would be easier and cheaper than slates. But it is much heavier that the roof timbers were designed for, so you'll probably have to strengthen them.
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On Fri, 24 Oct 2003 23:04:17 +0100, "Peter Taylor"

We have just used synthetic slate for the roof on our new bungalow, very pleased with the result. looks neat, clean and tidy.
The synthetic slate also appears to be very strong.
Paul
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but
you'll
the
http://www.clayisbeautiful.co.uk/pags/guideprices.htm (which seems to be eternit, which seems to be Marley...)
claim Spon's prices per sq m of roofing, including labour are around: 35 pounds for concrete tiles, resin slates or machine made clay tiles; 55 pounds for hand-made clay tiles or Natural Welsh slates.
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I always find Sons to be a bit under, especially here in the SE, but my Spons price book shows them to be Sloped Roofing 68m2 Double eaves course 31.26 linear metre Verge 27.19 linear metre Ridge or Hips 24.66 linear metre
Hope this helps
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It is unusual for you to have a choice. Slate is more often laid at too shallow an angle for tiles, which are thicker. In any case, if you go for tiles, you will need to have the roof strengthened as they will be a lot heavier.
Personally, I would always go for the original material, but slates are more expensive, unless you go to Wales with a lorry and buy them straight from the quarry. Greaves Slate in Ffestiniog are the only ones I know still making roofing slate, but you may need to order some time in advance.
Colin Bignell
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In this part of London - and much else of it which is Victorian - people used to pick whatever suited them. Luckily, many councils are now insisting on slate or imitation slate replacements if this was original. But of all the ones which were replaced with concrete tiles, it's rare to see one sagging due to the extra weight, as I'd guess the rafters etc are way oversized.
When I first bought my house I had to have the roof sorted PDQ, and had the rear addition re-done using concrete tiles as they were the cheapest option. When I came to do the whole lot properly about 10 years later I was surprised to see just how they'd degraded - the surface had gone 'powdery'. The artificial slate replacements still look good some 20 years later.
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TonyJeffs wrote:

Personally IU find slates ugly and depressing, but thats very personal and I love them on the floors.
If the roof will take the weight I'd go for tiles frankly.
I love tiles. I grew up in Surrey, and so many houses were clad in tiles on the walls as well as the roof. I loive teh natural earth colors. Cold wet slate always reminds me of my dreary grandparents house in cold damp south wales :-(, and dreary industrial towns populated by miserable people with miserable attitudes (Hi IMM!). Liewiase victoriana, so beloved today, merely evokes images of cold damp poverty stricken families who used to live in the ruddy stuff, choking their guts out with cholera or TB. .
I have always had a yen for the Jacobean. There you probably died in a sudden act of mindless violence, for bowing to the wrong sort of saint or something. Infinitely preferable.
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wrote:

Bloody Southern jessie

Typical bloody Surrey, trample the working class given half a chance
If you lived in Hastings, you'd probably be out sweating painters.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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Hi.
Only things I can add are: used slates are not expensive, and can be used to top up what youve got there - though youve got to watch the shades match. Also its poss to repair cracked slates with car body filler. I've not done it but am told it works very well.
Oh, and beware of used slates that are in fact asbestos sheets - thyre very easy to spot.
Regards, NT
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Further info. All the other houses on our block have had the slates replaced with modern tiles, some recent, others long time ago, so the rafters must be strong enough.
I'm the only one with slates, and was originally going to get the roof felted & the slates replaced (& replace damaged), but now I think perhaps it is better to match in with my tiled neighbours, thereby avoiding weakspot seams at the party lines.
Thanks
Tony
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snipped-for-privacy@meeow.co.uk (N. Thornton) wrote in message

Thanks. I'll remember the point about filler.
More info: I'm currently the only house on the block with slate. All the others have red tiles. I think slates over felt are best (I'd need 20% replacement slate), But the fact that I would be able to interlock tiles with my neighbours, thereby avoiding part-line joins is swaying me towards tiles.
Cheers
Tony
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I have no roofing knowledge - but can you interlock on both sides? What happens if the width of your roof is a non integer number of tiles?
James
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On Sun, 26 Oct 2003 11:01:53 -0000, James wrote:

Not all tiles interlock along the sides and can simply be cut to width.
I'd be more concerned about the battens on one side being at the same level as the other. An inch or so probably won't matter on 30' width but 6" and your tiles start to slope...
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James wrote:

You leave little gaps between them all. To exapnd teh row to the correct width.
Tiles have normally 3:1 overlap, so there is no problems with leakage.

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Heh heh. My roof was originally double pan tiles and they'd sort of crunched them up a bit to fit round the dormer. Leaked like a sieve.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Dave Plowman wrote:

MM. They used a LOT of lead under the tiles round my dormers. One leaked like a sieve, and the chippies redid it with properly done lead. No leaks now :-)

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Oh, it wasn't just at the dormer itself, but all over that part of the roof to the party wall. You could see daylight (no sarking felt) clearly through that part of the roof once the internal plasterboard was removed, but not on the other side where the tiles were properly fitted. I'm not certain if it was the original roof or replaced after war damage - the other half of the semi had the same tiles. But most other houses in the street, with what looked like original roofs, slate.
The zinc covering to the dormer also had pinholes, so a roof refurbishment was well due.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Got me James. I didn't mention for simplicity. (You could say lied, but that'd be unkind)The next door neighbour on one side has a brand new tiled roof. My other neighbour still has slate, but is set on getting a tiled roof. But he aint ready yet, so If I play my cards right & take the lead in negotiations, he gets to have the join, but not me. It's a ruthless, the politics of new roofs!
Tony
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