New housing for outer London

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On Mon, 18 Aug 2003 01:07:15 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@jibbering.com (Jim Ley) wrote:

They make a charge for that. It would cost me £25,000. Not quite free.
I'm juggling whether to bite the bullet and cut and run or leave it in realising that A.C. will get their £25K in charges anyway and the fund may continue to go down. Todays news that oil production probably peaked in 2000 and the Iraqi oil pipeline is likely to remain vulnerable to terrorist attacks in perpetuity does not bode well for the future.

Think "charges".

What I said up there ^ is true.
He has had £25 Billion from the pension funds. I guess he can't do without it now.

I don't want my pension fund to be swayed in it's investment decisions by the need to evade taxes, the market is quite perilous enough as it is. I want the investment decision to be the optimum one. The deal was I pay my income tax when I benefit from the pension. The pension funds have gone from a totally tax free environment to one where tax treatment (in some circs AIUI) is worse than a private individual. A pension is a 30+ year deal. GB has stuck his hands in the till but if I move my fund for any reason I'm hit by a 10% charge by Allied Crowbar.^^^ sorry, Zurich Bank^^^ sorry don't know anymore.
What a crock of shite.

??? Maybe they're still the best investment going, and that's not saying much. But taxed is taxed.

They both lost interest once they found out we already had a scheme with Allied Crowbar, since they wouldn't be able to recommend we change it (& get a commission on the sale) because of the charges.

Right then please consider the aggregate effect of all these adverse outcomes. Pensions tax, stock market, compulsory very poor value annuities. I reckon my pension will be down by at least 90%.
:-(

At some stage quite soon now the "Baby Boomers" will start retiring and then they will see what has happened to their pension provision and blood will very possibly run in the streets.

No it's recent tho' I still meet retired people at trade shows who were simply given a tax free cheque, no strings.

Invested! Bwahahahahahahahaha

Beats the hell out of me too, but that's what our good leaders dished up for us, it was the only way we could get tax relief, or rather deferrment of tax liability 'till we draw our pensions.
Ob on topic uk.diy reference = "Artex"
DG
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wrote:

I don't understand the oil industry at all well. However I was under the impression that in the North Sea and elsewhere they can drill into a seam horizontally if they need to. Now if that's the case surely they could get some riggers in there to bring the oil out without exposing pipework to hundreds of miles of open ground?
I know in the UK (for example) Esso Fawley (near Southampton) have underground pipes feeding the rest of the UK via buried pipelines. Now okay, they aren't drilling for oil down there, it comes off the oil tankers and is processed in the refinery. But why on earth are they putting the oil across land when it is an obvious terrorist target?
I know someone will say "well you can't do that overnight". But when the oil industry want something done they literally will move mountains to make it happen.
Andrew
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Andrew McKay wrote in message ...

the shortfall in the UK birth rate plus an allowance for the fact that an increasing percentage of our young people appear to be half witted. In my view immigrants are generally better looking and better behaved than us so I don't see them as a threat.
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Andrew McKay wrote:

Now this I have to take issue with. The type of unemployed IT "consultants" I come across are those who did very well in the late '90s, working mainly for telcos and .com startups, but who have no real skills.
Back in those days you could easily do contractinng at 70-100ph just by calling yourself an IT consltant and knowing enough jargon to convince your employer that you know more than they do.
I'm not saying that the migrant IT workers will be better or worse - I don't know. What I am saying is that the majority of those tens of thousands of unemployed IT consultants can't get jobs because they can't actually do anything - and not because there aren't enough jobs.
There is *plenty* of work in IT for those who have an identifiable skillset, which meets the needs of the IT industry as it is today
--
Grunff


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Huge wrote:

For networking contracts there is still a healthy pool of work at the 350 day rate level. The days of 900 per day 'firewall consultants' have thankfully passed.
Toby.
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writes:

For those of use who develop embedded products there isn't.
And even at the height rates were rarely above 350 pd.
Tim

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You really aren't in touch with reality.
Yes there are definitely many "IT consultants" who are fly-by-night cowboys. Every industry has those.
But there are a great many, in fact the majority, who have come upon hard times thru no fault of their own.
Andrew
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Andrew McKay wrote:

Hmmmm...Really? How about some real life examples?
I've elaborated plenty on my statement further down the thread - which bits in particular do you disagree with?
--
Grunff


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David W.E. Roberts wrote:

This group seems to be increasingly populated with ex-IT pros turned renovators. (My old telco popped after turning 9m into 300k for the fourth time running.)
Toby.
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--
geoff

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I imagine the original post to which you respond was aimed in my direction, and I'm very happy to admit that I've got out of IT and intend to make the handyman trade my full time profession - it isn't a safe harbour whilst the IT industry fixes itself (I won't get into arguments about whether it can be fixed here).
I come from a background whereby I've been heavily into DIY since well before I left school over 30 years ago. Installed a central heating system from scratch, lots of electrical work, built kitchens from a bare shell, loads of carpentry. You name it, I've DIY'd it :)
However that isn't to say that I pretend I can do everything. I'm totally honest about what I will take on and what I won't. Even today I was telling a client that I wasn't interested in taking on a job which we were discussing, despite it being within my reasonable capabilities.

I don't think that's true. Many IT people that I am familiar with would need instruction on which end of a screwdriver is the business end. And I wouldn't let them anywhere near a sawbench or other power tool. Many IT people can thru college, got their degree, and walked into IT without touching any other type of industry - so they know nothing else.
It's amazing how many people in this world can't do something simple like use a hammer to knock a nail into wood. Easy for me, my thumb knows all about the experience I've had ;)
Andrew
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On Sat, 16 Aug 2003 18:37:05 +0100, Dave Plowman

I'm interested in learning more about these workarounds. Can to elaborate?
Andrew
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wrote:

at a guess:
They used to be SE.
the IR decided that they couldn't be SE.
They got around it by becoming Ltd.
Hello IR35.
Tim

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Or make sure you work for several different employers each year - say six.
--
* I like you. You remind me of when I was young and stupid

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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On Sun, 17 Aug 2003 12:45:32 +0200, "tim"

Err no. Legislation was brought in in the late 80's which forced SE to go Ltd. I'm afraid that I wasn't a contractor then and the reasons escape me, but basically it was no longer possible to be SE and offering contractual services.
Andrew
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That's not true. It's perfectly possible to be self employed (sole trader) and to offer contractual services. What it's not possible to do is to offer those services via an agency unless one goes PAYE.
Most contractors can't be arsed to find their own work and construct their own contracts, they prefer to work via agencies. By doing this they fall foul of IR35, which is largely their own fault.
--
The wage of sin is death, but after the government has taken its share
all that is left is a tired feeling.
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wrote:

I'm not sure about that - I do know of one or two contractors who are sole traders but contract through an agency, and are not PAYE. A lot of agencies wouldn't touch them, though, because they do not have the protection of an intermediate (ie Ltd company) , which means that if they were assessed to be an employee of the agency then the agency would be chased for PAYE and NI at the full employment rates, rather than reduced sole trader rates.

The presence or otherwise of an agency is largely irrelevant for the purposes of IR35 - you can fall foul of it on a direct contract just as easily as through an agency. The "intermediate" part of "provision of services through an intermediate" refers to the limited company, and not the agency.
cheers Richard
-- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
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wrote:

That rings a bell for me. I read the reasons why going from SE to Ltd was required before now, but never committed to memory. But I think it had something to do with protecting the agencies arse.

That is correct. And since April this year IR35 can be applied to such trades as butler, nanny, gardener, and any other form of domestic worker. Many of those are direct contracts not using agencies.
Those trades haven't woken up to the fact yet. It'll happen when the tax inspectors pay a visit.
Andrew
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wrote:

I don't know if the population is not increasing, but certainly people are staying single until later in life, they are changing their partners more (so move out from shared home to separate - even for a short term), and are also divorcing more, which means even older people are becoming single.
Net result? More single people = more housing needed. Previously more couples shared - so less housing. This apparently is one of the biggest long term reasons for more housing - not an increased population.
D
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On Fri, 15 Aug 2003 15:30:49 +0100, "David Hearn"

Some months back I read an article that stated that at least 25% of households in the US were single-occupier. Here will probably go the same way.
A propos the areas to be developed, I thought the south bank of the Thames along into north kent was to be the first.
However, just where the jobs are to be to support the occupants of these areas is anyones guess. Central London/the City doesn't have the transport infrastructure to handle them.
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