Mould behind bed in bedroom...

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On Wed, 03 Dec 2003 18:22:11 GMT, Scott M
<rant snippage>

Seems like your house was designed by the same person that fitted our windows - see my rant in the 'uPVC door' thread :)
We would never have a new house ever ever ever ever.
Ever.
Unless we built it ourselves. -- cheers,
witchy/binarydinosaurs
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To bring a bit of balance in here... ;-)
I really like my new house! I't's 30 years old and was built with concrete blocks. Built into a granite hillside with a really nice, huge terrace across the front, facing south).
The lounge and kitchen is more-or-less one open-plan space (which we like), and it has a great utility room and cave (remember the hillside) behind.
The rooms are a good shape and size and ALL the doors into the bedrooms (including the one on the bottom floor) are in the corners of the rooms. Nice sized windows too.
Also, we have door to the outside from each of the 3 floors. And a decent-sized porch.
For those interested (or without a life of your own), I have some piccies at:
http://www.coakley.co.uk/personal/newhouse /
This house is in Brixham, Torbay, Devon.
So there!
;-)
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Howie wrote:

<foam> Balance??!??!? <dribble>
--
Scott

Where are we going and why am I in this handbasket?
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--
>
> I really like my new house! I't's 30 years old
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His recently acquired 30 yr old house...
--
Toby.

'One day son, all this will be finished'
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Ah. I see. Thanks.
Mary

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On Fri, 5 Dec 2003 18:28:05 -0000, "Mary Fisher"

As in "it's new to him" :) -- cheers,
witchy/binarydinosaurs
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Cave huh? You could build (dig) and extension without planning permission, and no-one would know, except the bats. And you might have to go a bit "great escape" with the stuff you dig out.
Bob
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Well, I may not have a life, but I ain't sitting waiting for 1.2Mb photos to download! David
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Witchy wrote:

Even then its fraught, when after gazing at the plans for a year and a half she walks in and say 'oh no. The bed can't possibly go there, and the TV has to be over there...and I really wanetd the towel rail there after all, and I don't want to have the door open straight onto the toilet' etc etc.

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wrote:

Funnily enough, just tonight as the Missus told me about her plan for putting up some Lindescrust (sp?) *on the walls* in the toilet (I know what some of you are like :) I made the mistake of saying that it would look nice in the bathroom that I've just spent the last mumble weeks finishing.
Note to self: keep mouth shut :) -- cheers,
witchy/binarydinosaurs
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Howie wrote:

All you need to do really is the old German Hausfrau trick of opening all the windows in the morning after getting up, to air the place, and shut em before the heating cuts in in the afternoon.
Its typical of what heppens in places that are double glazed with no other insulation - no ventilation, as DG seals down hard, build up of RH and condensatuon on cold walls that are uninsulated.
Dry lining the wall with a vapour barrier over insulation is the correct solution, as is adding some trickle ventilation - or even leaving the window open a crack and running a little heat in the room.
Full treatment would be to cavity fill with insulation, and add trickle vents.

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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Howie - insulation/ventilation is the best answer, but it's a biggish job and maybe a bit late to start it for this winter. If you want a KWIK-FIX solution, providing a warm surface e.g. using cork will stop the mould forming, but any vapour getting through to the cold surface will condense so make sure the warm surface is sealed properly. Any oil paint or varnish will do. I don't like heating bedrooms either, but some heat really is necessary - have you thought about fitting a Thermostatic Rad Valve? Or maybe a 500W tubular electric greenhouse-type heater might help.
Also consider ways of minimising the amount of vapour you produce. The obvious problems are drying clothes indoors (esp on radiators), non-ducted outlets from tumble driers and cooker hoods, using gas or paraffin heaters (freestanding ones without flues) and keeping the window closed when/after you have a shower. Gas cookers make tons of vapour just from burning the gas, as well as steam from things on the hob. Is there a fan in the bathroom or the kitchen, and is it working OK? Maybe a humidistat fan controller might help. A dehumidifier would certainly make a difference, but they use a fair bit of power.
Hope this helps Peter
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On Wed, 3 Dec 2003 12:25:45 -0000, "Peter Taylor"
|The Natural Philosopher wrote: | |> All you need to do really is the old German Hausfrau trick of opening |> all the windows in the morning after getting up, to air the place, and |> shut em before the heating cuts in in the afternoon.|> |> Its typical of what heppens in places that are double glazed with no |> other insulation - no ventilation, as DG seals down hard, build up of RH |> and condensatuon on cold walls that are uninsulated.|> |> Dry lining the wall with a vapour barrier over insulation is the correct |> solution, as is adding some trickle ventilation - or even leaving the |> window open a crack and running a little heat in the room.|> |> Full treatment would be to cavity fill with insulation, and add trickle |> vents.| |Howie - insulation/ventilation is the best answer, but it's a biggish job and |maybe a bit late to start it for this winter. If you want a KWIK-FIX solution, |providing a warm surface e.g. using cork will stop the mould forming, but any |vapour getting through to the cold surface will condense so make sure the warm |surface is sealed properly. Any oil paint or varnish will do. I don't like |heating bedrooms either, but some heat really is necessary - have you thought |about fitting a Thermostatic Rad Valve? Or maybe a 500W tubular electric |greenhouse-type heater might help.
Ah. I like the greenhouse-heater idea. We have one of those beds with a base made of 2 sections, wooden frame covered in fabric. I could stick a heater in there and it will heat the bed (a bit), whilst radiating warm air away from it all around (including next to the problematic outside wall. Would this work I wonder?
|Also consider ways of minimising the amount of vapour you produce. The obvious |problems are drying clothes indoors (esp on radiators), non-ducted outlets from |tumble driers and cooker hoods, using gas or paraffin heaters (freestanding ones |without flues) and keeping the window closed when/after you have a shower. Gas |cookers make tons of vapour just from burning the gas, as well as steam from |things on the hob. Is there a fan in the bathroom or the kitchen, and is it |working OK? Maybe a humidistat fan controller might help. A dehumidifier would |certainly make a difference, but they use a fair bit of power.
All good points. Thanks. I have a dehumidifier - but I don't want to run it in the bedroom. I might be able to find a place for it on the landing though. I WAS going to sell the damn thing! | |Hope this helps |Peter
Certainly does. Cheers.
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On Wed, 3 Dec 2003 12:25:45 -0000, "Peter Taylor"
<snip>

We have a tenant who had the exact same problem of mould on the bedsheets and wall, and we reckon it was because he was always drying clothes in there and showering with all doors open - bathroom is opposite the bedroom in question and the whole house is sealed up tight with Everest double glazing that even a gnat's fart can't get through :) -- cheers,
witchy/binarydinosaurs
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Witchy wrote:

En suite fantasies have a lot to answer for really.
All this stuff is old hat - happened in teh 60's with modern 'high rise' accomodation, when people moved from draughty damp slums to modern flats, but still expected to hag the washing round the living room and keep all the doors and windows shut.
And couldn't affor the 'modern' electric heating either...

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The Natural Philosopher wrote in message wrote:

Old hat? Yes of course, but it still needs to be explained - we all have to learn it at some time. I am amazed how people react sometimes when they are told their damp problem is condensation - it's like telling someone about their B.O. :o)
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On Fri, 5 Dec 2003 10:07:18 -0000, "Peter Taylor"

Yep, tenants we've got in another house need to be told this. I drove past the house this morning and the windows were streaming with wet.... -- cheers,
witchy/binarydinosaurs
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wrote:

suggestions is to make sure that there is room for air to circulate between the bedhead and the wall - I have used cotton reels fastened to a headboard to provide some space in the past.     Trickle vents in the windows and some heat sound the essentials.     Incidentally, from your description, I am not clear what is on the outside of the wall at this point - is the house on, or in, the hillside?
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On Wed, 03 Dec 2003 20:47:01 +0000, Brian S Gray
|One thing that might help a little when you try the earlier |suggestions is to make sure that there is room for air to circulate |between the bedhead and the wall - I have used cotton reels fastened |to a headboard to provide some space in the past. |    Trickle vents in the windows and some heat sound the |essentials. |    Incidentally, from your description, I am not clear what is on |the outside of the wall at this point - is the house on, or in, the |hillside?
Good suggestions, again.
The house is mainly _in_ the hillside. The bit of the house which is cut-in is only a unility room one floor down.
If you're REALLY interested, thare's a piccy of the side wall here:
http://www.coakley.co.uk/personal/newhouse/new_house_frontview_1.JPG
and here is a general one of the front of the house:
http://www.coakley.co.uk/personal/newhouse/new_house_frontview_2.JPG
You can see the side wall quite well from this first link and the top-left bedroom (and the one behind it I've discovered) is the problem. Below this level is the lounge (open-plan) which doesn't have this problem, although it's on the same wall, presumably because it's heated and ventilated continuously by default?
Thanks again.
H.
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