More power from shaver socket wanted

I recently bought a Water Pik (a water jet equivalent of dental floss) but its power needs appear to exceed that available from a standard UK shaver outlet. The device is rated at 25VA and it appears that the standard UK shaver outlet is rated at just 20VA. Anyway I get around just 45 seconds of use before the thermal cut-out turns the socket off for a few minutes.
The best and simplest solution would be to find a vendor who sells higher rated kit (i.e. integrated shaver transformer socket sets) but I haven't yet found that.
Another solution is to just buy a transformer which meets the spirit of the regulations (double-wound isolating transformer tested to 500V a.c. rms for one minute between windings) but specified to say 50VA and then hook it to suitable sockets, but I don't want to ask an electrician to do anything illegal and nor do I wish to put my home out of compliance with any IEE wiring or Heath and Safety regulations.
Does anyone have any suggestions?
Tony
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I think the British Standard limits them to 20W

Where did you get it from? Sounds like it wasn't designed for use in a UK bathroom.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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Andrew Gabriel wrote in message

Well I was talking about shaver outlets (for which there is a harmonised EN standard) rather than sockets-in-bathrooms in general, which is a different subject altogether. But now I'm trying to reacall whether I've seen a UK-type isolated shaver point in a (mainland) European bathroom. TBH I can't remember whether I have or not (which probably comes of being a wet-shaver). Odd though to have a harmonised standard used in the UK only.
On sockets in bathrooms in general, an article in 'Wiring Matters' (Issue 7, Spring 2000) which introduced the new 'zoned bathroom' regs. talks abut the ongoing argument. Harmonisation through CENELEC seesm to have fallen apart (again) leaving the UK free to do its onw thing. Equipment and appliance manufacturers are very keen to see sockets allowed, but while the IEE admits to "general agreement that a socket outlet in a bathroom protected by an RCD is unlikely to [significantly] increase the risk of electric shock" it goes in to say that "doubt remains". The anti lobby seems to be mainly the government, in shape of the HSE, DTI and DETR, who "do not think that the potential benefits are worth the risk".

OTOH 115V/5mA is 23k ohms. Would you _want_ to use a hairdryer with insulation resistance that low?
--
Andy



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On Fri, 8 Aug 2003 09:09:50 +0100, "Andy Wade"

Ireland?
Jim.
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snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote in message writes:

Hi.
Normally the transformer is only on when a plug is in place. If so one could theoretically fit a miniature mains fan (eg 3") within the fitting to cool the transformer. Result: no cutting out. However you mustnt do this as it will probably no longer comply with BS EN etc, and you might get it wrong and cook yourself.
Regards, NT
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Do it over the kitchen sink, and plug it into a 13A socket with a suitable adapter.
Roger
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Roger Mills wrote:

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Which make? I used to have a Braun one which worked fine in my bathroom on a shaver socket, but eventually the plastic tube covering disintegrated and I've never checked to see if it could be replaced.
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