Mitreing Angles Problem

I have to fit two pieces of trim to the angle betwen the bath and the wall on two sides . Not only do I have to cut the trim at a 45 deg angle to fit the corner the trim has to sit at an angle so it covers a gap betwen the wall and bath . I have a compund mitre saw ( electric) http://www.axminster.co.uk/default.asp?part ÌMS10 but am having trouble getting my head round the settings so i get the angles I want . Obviously I dont want to waste the trim so if anyone can give me any clues how to go about this I will practice on some scrap wood until I get the angles right . Stuart
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you will need to compound mitre them, rotate your saw 45 degrees to the horizontal AND vertical. Then I found the easiest way was to cut the beading in half, and hold them together (the 2 flat sides so that say if you had quadrant beading it would make a semi circle) and chop 'em. I found that this makes one corner, simply repeat for the rest. I can't expalin it my mail any better...!
I don't envy you. It took my neighbour and I about 2 hours to fully suss it out, and we managed to make several boxes of match sticks from 3m lengths before fully sussing it...
Scott
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This might help:
"http://www.readersdigest.co.uk/diy/webpages/165.htm "
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wrote:

complicated unfortunately :-) Stuart
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wrote:

Confused-You will be . :-) http://www.woodcraft.com/Woodcraft/assets/html/CompoundMiters.asp?URLCheck=1
Stuart
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On Tue, 23 Dec 2003 00:43:13 +0000, Stuart

Have you a mitre box ?
Establish the angle at which the trim has to be set t to fill the gap. Replicate this angle in the mitre box and then cut the 45 degreen meeting angle.
Paul Mc Cann
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I'd cut it by hand using an ordinary home-made wooden mitre block. The block would need to be big enough to accommodate the trim - which you would set in the block at its required finished angle and then simply cut through at 45 degrees. You could seat the trim in the block, against pins or against a lath nailed in, in order to repeat the cut exactly Gadgets and gizmos like compound mitre saws are often more trouble than they are worth and tend to lead you away from simpler trad ways of doing things.
cheers
Jacob
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On 22 Dec 2003 23:47:42 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@jpbutler.demon.co.uk (jacob) wrote:

I had thought of that ,maybe making up a 45 degree wooden block to support it then cutting the mitre -might be simpler .:-) Stuart
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(jacob) wrote:

Stuart - have you ever cut plaster ceiling coving? It's the same problem except you're working upside down! :o) I made a special mitre box to do it and it really does make things easy. I'm not sure if you want to bother with this for just one or two joints, but here's what to do.
Assuming the size of your trim is <= 2" wide?, cut a piece of 12mm ply or MDF about 9" square for the base. Next cut 4" long block of 4 x 2 planed timber nice and square and screw it flat to the ply in one of the corners using 4 screws. Then make an accurate vertical saw cut across it at 45° on plan (from corner to corner of the ply), down to the ply surface - this makes the cutting guide slot.
Using simple trig, now work out the width of your trim in the horizontal plane when it's at the angle you want. Then accurately screw 2 pieces of 2" x 2" on the ply, that distance away from the 2 sides of the 4x4 block. Mitre the meeting ends of the 2x2 before you fix them and use a saw in the slot in the 4x4 to maintain a gap in this mitre to form the cutting guide slot in the 2x2.
You now have a bespoke mitre box. Depending which way round you place the trim in the channel you can form either internal or external angles.
Peter
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This is more or less what I meant except that an ordinary general purpose mitre box will do as long as it is big enough to hold the work piece. You can locate the piece with pins etc in order to replicate the same cuts. It does not really matter if the work piece is not exactly canted at 45 deg as long as all the pieces cut are at the same angle. It also helps to cut things slightly oversize and you can then work back with a block plane if necessary.
cheers Jacob

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This is the method I used for compound cuts:-
http://www.dewalt.com/us/articles/article.asp?ID=2
Of course, when I had all the angles worked out to two decimal places and tipped the saw over (both ways) I found that it 'clunked' into existing detents... I think someone had been there before me.
Mike H.
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On 23 Dec 2003 05:47:08 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Mike Hobbs) wrote:

I should have thought of this before but round the bath at present I have a piece of quadrant moulding to take up part of the space but the paint keeps peeling off because of the wetness so I placed a piece of quadrant against the mitre saw fence then put the plastic moulding against that and that gave me the required angle and then I mitred it so it was easier than I thought it would be . thx guys all. Stuart
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wrote:

Having no succesfully cut the trim to the required angle and a damn fine job I made of it I need to fix the trim ( plastic) to the bath and wall and will follow it up with a thing seal of silicon. Will silicon be sufficient to stick the trim to the bath/wall or should I use something else . Presumably it will be advisable to do this with a bath full of water . Stuart
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