Looking for Oregan or yellow pine

I'm looking for a quantity (about 30 sqyd) of Oregon or yellow pine planking to repair fire-damage in an old (1860) house. This is material that would have been used widely for wainscotting at that time.
I wonder if anyone could advise me where might be a sensible place to look on-line for this kind of material?
--
Timothy Murphy
e-mail (<80k only): tim /at/ birdsnest.maths.tcd.ie
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Timothy Murphy wrote in message ... I'm looking for a quantity (about 30 sqyd) of Oregon or yellow pine planking "yellow pine" can mean anything from Quebec Yellow (a cheese-like timber used for woodcarving) to Southern Yellow, which is hard and resinous. IIRC Oregon pine is rather like Douglas Fir in appearance. Reddish with a flowery grain? Can you mark it with your thumbnail? There's a long tradition in the industry of calling softwoods anything you damned well please. I mean, "Scots pine" for chrissake.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
'Oregon pine' is another name for 'Douglas fir' which is also called Columbian or British Columbian pine, which would not likely be used for panelling. 'Yellow pine' is a common name for Pinus Strobus - also known as Quebec yellow pine amongst many other names - depending on source. This was be used for panelling and other quality internal work due to it's low shrinkage - was used for drawing boards etc. But I wouldn't assume that your panelling is yellow pine unless you have a definite identification. All sorts of stuff was used, as available. But for the purposes of replacing existing panelling - which would be painted or varnished anyway, I'd go for 'unsorted swedish redwood' which is generally available and can be good quality, but you would want to dry it well beforehand i.e. keep it stacked 'in sticks' i.e. with laths between planks for ventilation, in a dry and warm place for 6 months or so. Or you could risk not drying it but the panels would shrink in the frames and you would have to touch up the paintwork later. Or you can get Yellow pine from many of the bigger timber merchants. There is also 'Western yellow pine' - the sapwood (wide in old trees) resembles Quebec yellow pine and is used for the same purposes as it is stable and dries well. They were (still are?) both used for pattern making as they are easily worked and stable.
cheers
Jacob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.