Loft Insulation

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Bt what you have failed to see, is that these rooms have a large percentage of ceiling area. A ceiling that will be very cold above in winter and very hot in summer. It is worth packing in as much insulation as possible just to improve the comfort levels of these rooms alone.

and
See above twice.

< snip. He can't follow something simple, not worth going on >
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Can't answer quantitatively, but for the same reason I put down 4inches (HTF does one cope with a foot of insulation?)
It's made a big difference, there was already a skimpy fibregass layer there, but it's pretty well just the 4 ins.
So I think I would stick with 4 ins ant take the losses, at least I can still find joists, wiring, pipes, chimneys etc.
mike r
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Whilst we are on the subject on loft insulation what's the consensus for insulating in, around and over the cold water tank? I popped into the loft the other day to set the traps for our annual tiny footed visitors and thought I must do something with the tank, at the moment I have the tank insulated and up on a platform with the patch of loft insulation removed underneath it, I was thinking of boxing the whole thing in with ply and some polystyrene sheet fixed to that to form an insulated box.
TIA
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David

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writes

is
The usual method is to have a tank jacket and the loft insulation curved up and to the sides of the tank.
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writes

The tank has a jacket but is about 4' in the air on its platform which is why I thought of putting insulated panels around its open support structure, I suppose the real question is whether the insulation below needs to be still left out if the tank itself is insulated well enough
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David

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On Thu, 22 Jan 2004 15:16:24 +0000, snipped-for-privacy@chaplehouse.demon.co.uk wrote:

I would insulate with sheets around the platform as you describe, David. That way there is a small heat source from the house. I suppose you could put a small amount of insulation on the ceiling below the tank if you box in like this, but there is probably nothing much to be gained.
If you simply put a thicker insulation around and under the tank, it will simply reduce the rate at which the water cools in the tank when the loft is very cold. In effect you are then gambling with how long that is going to take.
.andy
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If you're going to that much trouble, keep the insulation removed beneath it and tie the boxing in insulation to the surrounding loft insulation. That makes the cold water tank part of the "warm" side of the house.
Christian.
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Know any sheep farmers? Sheep wool is virtually worthless, unless you have *LOTS*.
Rick
On Wed, 21 Jan 2004 16:16:10 +0000, Dean Richard Benson

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