Loft Conversion, Steel Trimmer end bearing support

Hi
I am one day into have a loft conversion completed on a modern trust rafter house by a specialist loft conversion company. They ran into a few problems, which they are doing there best to sort out, but it lead to be to have a good look at he work completed so far.
I have a couple of concerns about the steel trimmers they have put as the new supporting members across the width of the house. One of the steels (I beam) is 30cm high and 6 meters long. One end is supported on an internal load bearing wall and that looks fine, but the other end is supported on the external wall.
The 'stack' goes like this: I beam 300mm high, 6 meters long, cut at 45 degrees (to fit under tiles); 30mm thick, 100mm wide, 400mm long steel plate; 60mm thick, 100mm wide, 400mm long new timber member (to raise height); existing wall plate (I assume as I can't see). The concern is that the overlap of the I beam onto the steel spreader plate is only 50mm. The architects drawing shows a square ended beam (ie not cut at 45 deg) sitting a full 100mm on to the steel plate.
I also believe there should be a 25mm gap between the steel and the existing timber ceiling joists - is that right? If so I have less than 10mm - the builder said no, that is only between the new floor joists and old ceiling.
Should I be worried? What is the building inspector going to say about A) the overlap and B) the use of timber in the 'stack' C) the lack of gap?
Thanks in advance Kev
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kevin Walton wrote:

I'd be worried. We've just finished a loft conversion and both the structural engineer and the building inpector were very fussy about the load bearing parts of the project. A 50mm overlap is certainly not enough.
I'd phone the building inpector NOW and get him round as son as possible because if he says it's not good enough you are in a stronger position regarding the builder wgo has (presumably) agreed to do the work to the current regs.
Out steels which were only 4m long had to rest on concrete pads. If my roof rested on a bit of wood I'd want to make sure it was oak and could never get wet even if the roof later leaked
N
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12 Nov 2003 09:26:19 -0800, a particular chimpanzee named snipped-for-privacy@unseen.org (Kevin Walton) randomly hit the keyboard and produced:

The Building Inspector is probably going to want the structural engineer who originally designed the work to have a look at it and provide revised calculations to justify the reduced bearing onto the steel plate. He is (very likely) going to want the timber bearing replaced with concrete or engineering brick. So get in early and contact him now (well, Monday).
With regard to the gap between the beam and the existing ceiling, the amount of deflection can be calculated quite precisely. For a span of 6m it would be limited to a maximum of 14mm, but again check with the engineer as to the amount that has been allowed for, and make sure that there is sufficient gap under the beam.
--
Hugo Nebula
"You know, I'd rather see this on TV,
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You used an architect but he seems to have faded out of the picture. Why was he not consulted before any of the building work was altered? Once you agree to the builing alterations without his approval he is free from recriminations and so are the builders. If you don't have it in writing you don't have it.

The last drawing he gave you shows you what you are supposed to have. Anying else and you are on your own with a legal hassle between you and the builders.
Only my opinion of course. You may want to try this at UK.legal or whatever the group is called.
--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

especially about the non spec 45deg cut to accomodate the RSJ under the tiles
how did the Architect imagine it would fit uncut ?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 22 Nov 2003 00:22:28 -0000, a particular chimpanzee named "Chris Oates" <none> randomly hit the keyboard and produced:

I've seen plenty of plans for loft conversions. Some 'architects' have a habit of drawing plans to show that the conversion will comply, irrespective of whether or not it matches the house construction.
--
Hugo Nebula
"You know, I'd rather see this on TV,
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.