Lock terminology

I need to replace the Euro sash lock on my front door, the latch part has long since given up the ghost and the actual lock buggered up on Monday resulting in a visit from the locksmith to get me back in.
Looking on Screwfix they have various sorts but I'm a bit stumped with the terminology eg with this one
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?tsX110&id#987
How are the backset (60mm) and the center (72mm) measured.
The knackered lock is not very deep, only 50mm from faceplate to back of lock, if I was to get one that was deeper would the holes for handles and cylinder still be in the right place
Cheers
Jim
--
Remove BRAIN before replying



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I had a bugger of a job changing my locks before I eventually had all the doors/windows replaced. Ended up with the lock cylinder sticking out of the doorlock inside by a few mm.
The descriptions are a bit confusing and the order the lot approach doesn't work either. ;-)
Mark S.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My front door is 45 mm thick the handles are about 11 mm where they house the lock so thats about 67 and there is a slight prominence to the keyholes -that makes it 70mm. There was a door on a cottage in Wales a friend had that stuck about an inch or more into the room. I'm surprised she never complained when they fitted the new door as the house was very small.
I wonder if they told her it was a hangar for wet coats and umbrellas rather than drive all the way to civilization for a replacement.
It worked OK though. You drop the cartridge by unscrewing the bolt in the faceplate of the lock. Its a phillips that runs into the bottom of the barrel. Hope I haven't lost you there. They are dead easy to work on once you have seen one in pieces. It's just that one bloody set that put me off them. I don't know what make they were.
Here is how to take your door off if the worst ever comes to the worst again:
Tap the pins out of the hinges with a 4" nail. If they are cheapo hinges then you might have to get thin masonry nails or similar. Keep one handy there's a good boy.
Put a support under the door and a couple of thin wedges in the hinge side to force the door away from them.
Get someone to tap the door in to you from the outside. Do this gently to stop the door getting damaged by the halves of the hinges left in the door.
Alternatively, bend the hinges out of the way. It might be the devil of a job to put them back anyway, so get a set of new ones.
I don't know how you'd get on with one of those fancy modern ones. Mine are drop fit types so I'd have to grind mine away. And even then it has bolts all over it like an hedgehog, so the locksmith would be busy.
--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"> The cartidge fits flush with the handles so it's the width of the door +

I've always called them 'cylinders' never heard the expression 'cartridge before. As long as you have either a key or a thumbturn on the inside it's dead easy to change them, it's when you have neither that a wee bit know how comes into it's own.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 4 Jan 2004 14:06:59 -0000, "Ron Ireland"

"Cylinders" rotate. "Cartridges" are found on Euro-style (and the variants) where there's a cylinder and a non-rotating piece around it, both of which are easily swappable as a unit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

backset = front of lock to centre of handle spindle hole or lock cylinder hole (both are same distance from front of lock) I think the centres they are referring to = distance from centre of lock cylinder hole to handle spindle hole The lock you have linked to is a european style lock which is probably not suitable for you.

No, the backset is the important measurement, that is the measurement that determines how far away from the edge of the door the handles are. From your measurements you have what is broadly known as a "narrow stile" mortice lock. You might need to go to a locksmiths shop to get the right lock, the cylinders are normally sold seperately from the lockcase. The lock cylinders come in different lengths to suit the width of your door. Is your door wood, metal, plastic?
regards
chris

-- Can't think of good sig at present.....maybe later --
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks to all for the response. I trawled round the various local sheds and lock shops but they were either closed or didn't have anything to suit. A bit more searching on the net and yes, I do have a narrow mortice lock so ordered one from these people
www.locksonline.co.uk (they actually have quite an informative and helpful website)
Couldn't be bothered to hunt around anymore and even with delivery probably won't work out any more expensive than going to a shop.
Cheers
Jim
--
Remove BRAIN before replying
"Sump Plug" <sump snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.