lighting rose driving me nuts arrrr help!!!!!!!!!

Hi I got a house 60s and I have replaced my rose with a new one.
Now I have 2 black wire one was by its self and one was wound round 1 thicker black/very dark gray wire + 2 red live wires wound together
In the old rose the 2 red went to one wire the black and gray and one of the black went to the other connection and the last black wire to an earth that was not wired up to anything .
I connected the 2 reds to the brow live of the new rose the gray and black to the neutral and the final black to the earth.
When I replaced the fuse the light was inverted and was on when it should be off and when I turned it off it blew the fuse.
So I swapped them around made no difference.
Now I have placed the thicker gray in the neutral and the live in the live and the 2 black in the earth and now the lamp stays on all the time.
I have tried every combination, and it is either inverted or always on or always off.
Help
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You need a wiring diagram. I made exactly the same mistake when my daughter pulled one of the wires out changing a bulb. The mistake I made was not to credit that the wire could reach across to the switch. Finally I realised I needed help and consulted the Collins DIY manual. One of the roses detailed in there was what I had and then it was fixed.
Get yourself a relevant book before proceeding or call a sparky.
Peter
--
Peter Ashby
School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Scotland
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Many ceiling roses from a DIY store include a wiring diagram. There are also DIY books on the subject. Studying the diagram should make it obvious what you've done which is about the most common mistake people make when first playing around with electricity.
It should act as a good lesson - to understand what you're doing before doing it. Mains electricity isn't a toy.
--
*Procrastination is the art of keeping up with yesterday.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or have a look a nice web page such as
http://www.userview.net/loop1.html
Adam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
London SW 12

Or call in one of the over paid, under-qualified chimps that are slated on here from time to time....is that the smell of more cream heading in the direction of a sparky? Richard.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not at all. But you really should read up about doing this sort of job before starting. Or even ask here *before* it all goes pear shaped.
--
*How many roads must a man travel down before he admits he is lost? *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thasser nice site
Mike R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And/or follow this advice (assuming you have a loop in ceiling rose).
1. Switch off the power.
2. Use some form of continuity tester to discover which cable goes to the switch.
3. Connect all the other blacks together via the N terminal.
4. Connect all the other reds together via the L terminal.
5. Connect all the green & Yellows together via the E (or funny earth symbol terminal
6. Take the black from the switch wire and either put some red sleeve or a bit of red insulating tape on it and connect it to the remaining terminal.
7. Connect the fitting brown wire to the L terminal
8. Connect the fitting blue wire to the N terminal
9. Connect the fitting green & yellow (if present) to the E terminal.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, should learn to put my brain in gear before engaging my typing fingers!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, should learn to put my brain in gear before engaging my typing fingers!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@uk2.net (Chris Holmes) wrote in

....again
Mike R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Mike Ring" wrote in message

Pretty pictures, but see how many mistakes you can spot on the page about fuses at http://www.userview.net/consumerunit_fuses.html .
-- Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You've got me there, I must confess I went straight from fusewire to MCBs.
So I guess it's not such a nice site
Mike R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

about
I never looked further than the lighting page. I see the mistakes but I still believe the lighting pictures are ok.
A picture is worth a thousand words.
Adam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Mike Ring" wrote in message

Well this is what I sent to them via their feedback form:
There are several mistakes on your page about fuses at: http://www.userview.net/consumerunit_fuses.html
1. The standard is BS 1361 not BS 1362 (1362 is for plug top fuses). 2. For immersion heater you meant to say 15 or 20 amp, not 5 or 20 amp! 3. For radial circuits the allowable floor areas were increased some years ago: 50m^2 for the 20A circuit and 75m^2 for the 30A circuit. 4. Many showers (over about 7kW) will require a 45A fuse, not 30A as stated. 5. On this page about fuses, the picture shows a consumer unit with MCB's!"
I could have gone on: how often will a domestic immersion or storage heater circuit require a 20A fuse?
Anyway, I received a very polite reply saying that they welcome the feedback and will continue "to continuously improve" (sic.) the site. Oh, and could I check all the wiring digrams for them! I think I'll send them a quotation for doing that...

I hadn't come across it before. The pictures are nice, most of the electrical information is OK, but, like everything on the Web, there are traps for the unwary novice.
-- Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ARWadsworth wrote:

Wish I knew about that before. Daughter did same thing, ripped out old rose to fit Ikea rubbish and realised she didn't know how to rewire. I had to email her a sketch and then remotely diagnose what was what. She only had neon screwdriver. It took 3 goes to get it right, no shorts or bangs on the way though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rule no.1 - always note the connections before you remove the old rose!
:-)
From what you have said, I would deduce the following:
The black wire wound round the dark grey wire is neutral.
The 2 red wires wound together are live.
The black wire on its own is switched live.
Use a test screwdriver/ multimeter to deduce which wire is going to your wall switch and open the switch as well to see what type/colour of flex is present there.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I would have looked in the switch first, but there are 5 wires, as he describes, 2 switch and 3 feed, and what worries me is did the last occupier use an earth for carrying current ie switch wire
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.