lead sheathed wiring

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wrote:

ring
reused,
0.044in.
Same here, but it was were the cable went into the / wooden / fuse box in the old kitchen [1], my brother was doing his homework lat one night after everyone else has gone to bed, noticed a burning smell and looked up to see the fuse box in flames....
[1] The house was 1895 with a new 1950's kitchen had been built onto the house but the room concerned still had the original coal fire range in place but dis-used (together with servants bells etc.) - worth a bloody fortune now I expect, both the house and the range !
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Yes - I've seen lead used for 5 amp power sockets - just not any big enough for 15 amp ones, although I'd guess it existed.
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"mark al" wrote | a query for the electrically minded folk. | i have discovered some of this type of wiring in the lighting | circuits for my house.the socket circuits are rewired with new | cable but the previous owner decided not to bother with removing | it for the lights . obviously it will have to be removed but im | just interested to know how old this cable would be and how | urgently should i get it replaced ( all electrics functioning | ok but safety wise who knows?)
It may well be in surprisingly good condition if it was properly installed in the first place and not buggered about with since.
However, as the previous owner's rewiring job was rather incomplete it is possible that the lead sheathed wiring was removed from the old fusebox and connected to the new consumer unit without due regard to its earthing, as lead cable is usually earthed by having a termination screwed onto the sheath and then fixed into a conduit box. Also, at all the junction boxes and ceiling roses the lead sheaths had to be bonded together. If this wasn't done properly your lighting circuits and all the cable are unearthed, which could be rather nasty.
What you can do (or get done) is a megger test for insulation between the cores and the sheath, and for conductivity between all the switches and points back to earth. If it passes those tests reasonably well then you probably don't need to rewire before christmas, but the job should be done soonish. If it fails those tests then the cabling should be regarded as an immediate risk and taken out of service asap.
Owain
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-snip-
Yes, though I would think it a risk whether it passes or not. Exposed PBJ may have powdered away, bare metal conductors exposed and very closely spaced, the mess likely covered with dirt and cobwebs. One small movement, or one more spider, and you could get burnt to death. If it passed a leakage test I still wouldnt want it. Suggest you get it disconnected and use plug in lights.
Regards, NT
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<snip>
A little tale from a colleague I used to work with...
They`d done a rewire in a church and spent happy hours stamping on lots of old lead cables under the flooring which would flatten out in a rather satisfying way.
Then they discovered they were the pipes for the organ...
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Though vaguely amusing I suspect that smacks of UL, you're not really suggesting that a bit of lead wire could be confused with an organ pipe are you? They are just a little bit different in diameter.
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wrote:

The 'supply pipes' might not be, are you confusing the 'Organ Pipes' with the pipes IYSWIM ?!
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The pipes that the air passes through on the way to the pipes which sound on an organ are very big I seem to remember. They need to be to minimise any noises that they might make.
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IMPLUYPW too
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with
??? !!! ?...
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wrote:

I suspect he means little pneumatic pipes linking the console with the organ itself, not the ones that make the sound - a system used in pre-electric days. At the business end these would connect with what were effectively pneumatic relays controlling access to the music pipes
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Ah yes, there are some small[ish] pipes for pneumatic couplers on old organs aren't there. I still think you'd have to be pretty silly to confuse them with wires.
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I know the two lads involved - I served my time with them !
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So, how long do you get for nicking lead from churches these days then? ;-)
As a slight aside... in almost every electrical installation I've worked on in various homes, I have come across old redundant wiring which has often needed to be investigated before being pronounced 'dead', and accordingly is a right PITA - does NICEIC (sp?) dictate that old wiring should be removed on a rewire, or is it regarded as best practice to do so? Or not?
David
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

`fraid i`m a little rusty - I haven`t been house bashing for ~13 years now - I moved up to distribution switchgear and ended up office based as my back went within about 3 years (found I was in tears in pain in the van one day, and it occurred to me that "somethings' not right here") - now office based and regd disabled...
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