Is tanalised timber green?

Hi Gang
I will be ordering some timber from my local timber yard to make a garden bench.
Thinking 2x4 nominal PAR tanalised timber. Now the treated timber (sawn) at the depots is a horrible green. But is that tanalised or just weather treated?
I want to stain and varnish this bench so don't want the green stuff!
Cheers
EC
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Eric Cartman wrote:

Some is, some is more brownish I think.
In time it all goes grey anyway.

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Question is then, can I stain on top of these colourings?
EC
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On 14 Jul 2003 23:37:55 -0700, ERIC___ snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Eric Cartman) wrote:

It might be worth looking a bit further. I found that most of the DIY stores had timber that was simply dipped in green preservative (not pressure treated) - but they didn't claim it either - I forget what the weasel words were. Timber yards had pressure treated, but again in green.
Eventually I found a choice of green and brown pressure treated timber at a fencing company with their own saw mill who are also manufacturing fencing rather than just stocking. They have their own pressure treating plant and were doing both colours - the brown being a little more than the green.
You can stain on top of green as long as the brown is a fairly dark one. Paler colours will tend to look rather muddy.
.andy
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The Brown/Green often depends upon what it is treated with.
Brown is better for soil contact (always damp), green is best for dry areas.
The dampness of the wood effect what will attack it.
You can find in depth anaylsis of the different treatments if you search google.
Rick

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On 15 Jul 2003 08:50:04 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@ukmisc.org.uk (Huge) wrote:

Planed All Round. "Finished", in other words.
--
John

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PAR - Planed All Round.
--
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wrote:

I have had to order it PAR, the timber yard have to place an order for the PAR as they only stock sawn. Have confirmed it will come in Green :( so will have to try some dark stains on it!
At least if I make the bench and it falls to bits after the first season it was me that did it and not BandQ :) can't blame anyone then.
Cheers
EC
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I'd have thought if it has to be ordered, you could have asked for clear pressure treated stuff. I *think* tanalised is green purely for easy identification, and checking how far the treatment has penetrated.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Dave Plowman wrote:

The only time I bought tanalised timber it was a *light* brown colour - about as dark as pine goes after being exposed to sunlight for a couple of years. I painted it with white microporous paint and it covered with one coat.
Maybe someone can confirm this but I thought that Tanalising was a specific process, maybe even a trademark, and therefore not all pressure treated timber is *tanalised*, it could just be Cuprinol green wood preservative or similar applied in a pressure vessel.
Oh, and when Tommy Walsh uses tanalised timer on Ground Force it never looks green.
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writes

wood
--
geoff

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In uk.d-i-y, Eric Cartman wrote:

Note that tanalised timber contains poison (arsenic I think), I wouldn't want to make a picnic bench out of it.
In uk.d-i-y, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

This is true, but what has this to do with uk.broadband. Hi! ;-)
I found the best effect was to allow the timber to weather for a couple of years, then clean with a pressure washer. You may be able to get some weathered timber from the yard.
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Nigel Mercier

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Copper, Chrome and Arsenic.
There'll be a mad woman in any minute now to rant on and on about it. FWIW when cutting any preserved timber or indeed any timber, wear a dust mask. Don't use the sawdust or shavings for pet bedding.
Personally I don't worry about the arsenic content of treated timber, worrying about the name is stupid. All beer contains arsenic - does that worry you unduly?
--
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ERIC___ snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Eric Cartman) wrote:
Hello Eric

Could be both, the green is just dye to indicate it's been treated.

Then you prolly don't want tanalised, the chemicals can mess up varnish and stain to an alarming degree. Staining and varnishing tanalised wood is two belts and braces, better to stick to normal PAR (cold grown softwood if you can't get hardwood)
--
Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
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Genuinely tanalised timber is always green. Some other treatments can be brown; both solvent based and stink a bit.
What you need is protimised timber; this doesn't have a colour and will take any finish. Just had my 14x5 purlins done like this.
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Don't think this is the meaning of surface water. I'd guess they mean immersed in water on the ground for some time - not merely wet.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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wrote:

Hmm possibly. Too late anyway as my tanalised timber is turning up next week!
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