Internal Kitchen Ventillation

Hi I am moving my kitchen to a small internal room, (around 11 cubic metres). If I have a gas hob I believe I need an extractor fan. What if I have an electric ? Does anyone know the building regs ? Basically it took me 1.5 days to drill a flue hole I don't wanna have to repeat it for a ventilation hole.
Cheers in advance.
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A room without windows or ventilation with a gas appliance is a big NO !!! Even with electrical cooking appliances and no ventilation you run the risk of condensation problems with a the steam that is produced. So either way you'll need some sort of venting into the room.
You will need some sort of inlet and outlet ventilation because you can't extract anything if nothing is coming into the room. The whole point of proper ventilation is to create air change at a set rate for the size of room and this then varies according to appliances that are used in it.
One way around ventilation problems is to vent one room into another which already has permanent vents. But this can also cause the transfer of smells and moisture into other areas of the property where you don't really want them to be.
Remembering that this is an internal room, so no matter what system you use to extract air from it, you'll also need to allow air to flow back into it. So to create a proper flow and properly vent the room, you'll need to set up two systems.
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BigWallop wrote:

Big Wallop is basically correct. You will need at the least an extractor system whose size is defined in the regulations for the size of room and its intended purpose.
I am not clear as to what the flue hole was for, but there is a chance you could extract into that.
ou proably need at least a 6" fan.
As far as ingress goes, again teh regulations are specific. There needs to be a way for fresh air to enter the room. This may be a vent in an outside wall, with or withouit a dicting system, or it may under certain circumstances which may or may not apply in your case, be some form of internal vent or 'leaky door' between the kitchen and a room that has 'adequate ventilation'.
If you HAVE and outside wall, teh simplest thing to do is to cut a oair of holses in it as far apart as possible, 6" fan on one, and a grille on the other - probably equipped with a 'hit and miss' sliding plate.
You may also need to look at fire esacpe routes from a room with no windows - smoke alarms covering exit routes may be required.
None of this is going to be trivial.
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Visit this site for guidance; www.smoke-alarms.co.uk
Also on Links page is route to free copy of the Building Regs in pdf format.
Scottish version also listed.

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Most fan vented rooms I've seen just have an exhaust fan. The air comes in through the gaps around the room's door, through the other rooms, and initially through the various draught sources in the house. So I think it depends on your level of existing air throughflow, and how much movement you need. If you have a well draughtproofed door and house I'd agree with BigWallop. But those of us that live in ancient ruins needn't worry so much about providing extra intake.
HRV passively moves heat in the outgoing air to the incoming air. Kitchens produce a lot of heat. So if you do use a 2 tube system, the addition of an HRV at the outside could save you a lot of heat. Theyre quite cheap too.
Regards, NT
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