Internal Kitchen Building regs

Hullo I am shifting my kitchen to be internal in a 2nd floor flat. 1) I am putting in an extractor fan at ceiling level does it have to be a 30 or 60 LPS ? 2) I have an internal window to a bedroom, I will be closing this: Does 12.5mm plasterboard have the required fire retardency. Can I use glass bricks/special glass and if so will it meet regs ? Cheers DD
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Dave D wrote:

I think from memory the bigger size.

Pretty sure thats OK., remember to provide for ingress of fresh air or the fan won't work.
And put in LOTS of LV spots to make it bright and cheery.

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For a kitchen with no natural daylight, I would look at installing a lighting scheme which is capable of giving you nearer daylight lighting levels for use during the daytime. You won't be able to get even close to this with any type filament lighting (unless you are also installing air conditioning in the room;-) Also, the colour temperature of filament lighting (2700-2800K) will look too low for anything near daylight lighting levels.
However, this lighting level will feel wrong in the early morning and evening when you are using artificial lighting in the rest of the house, so I would have a secondary lighting scheme to provide the more normal levels of artificial lighting for the kitchen when daylight levels are not appropriate. The two schemes would ideally have different colour temperatures too.
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Andrew Gabriel

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Building regs don't apply to non-structural alterations. But if your flat is part of a block 3 storeys or more the you should conform to building and any fire regulations
If you want to conform then Your fan would be better if extracting at 60 l/s. If a cooker hood then 30 l/s will suffice. You also need some fresh air ingress to the kitchen.
Your 2 x 12.5mm board and 3mm skim will be OK.
Don't forget your 1/2 hour self closing fire door and intumescent strips, and make sure your means of escape from other rooms is not affected.
Also make sure any management company is aware of the alterations and approval is given.
dg

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They definitely apply to the movement of any part of the drainage system which will probably be required if you are moving the kitchen.
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On Tue, 6 Jan 2004 16:35:06 -0000, a particular chimpanzee named "dg"

Not strictly true. Building Regulations also applies to any alterations to fire safety, drainage, combustion appliances, and replacement windows, boilers and hot water cylinders. Most of the requirements also apply to any change of use to dwellings (converting a building), hotels or public buildings. Not to mention of course new buildings and extensions.

Whereas if the work doesn't affect any of the requirements mentioned above (no matter what height the building is), then the Building Regulations don't apply.
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Hugo Nebula
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On 6 Jan 2004 03:04:15 -0800, a particular chimpanzee named los_dos snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Dave D) randomly hit the keyboard and produced:

If it's not a cooker hood, then 60 litres/sec should be provided. If you have accommodation above you, be careful where the extract ducting runs. It shouldn't run above the ceiling, or between your flat and the common stair.

If it's a window between two rooms, then generally it doesn't need fire resistance per se. If it is a window onto a stair or an internal lobby, then it does need 30 minutes fire resistance. 12.5 p/bd both sides of a stud (or two layers on the room side) should give this. AFAIK, most glass blocks do give 30 mins f/r, provided that fire resisting cement is used. Fire resistant glass (such as georgian wired) can be used.
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