insulating under wooden floors

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Never! You may get a few mm of moisture up a brick set directly in a pool of water but a metre! You've been talking to too many "damp course" salesmen.

That isn't rising damp, its an Artesian Well!

First sensible bit you've written.

Just open your wallet and say after me......
J.
--
John Rouse

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John Rouse wrote

John, I am a Chartered Building Surveyor. I qualified in 1975 and was elected FRICS in 1989. I have been in practice as a Consultant for 20 years and often act as an expert witness in claims against damp-proofing contractors.
Your statements about dampness in brickwork are blatantly misinformed and I don't really understand where you can have picked up such silly ideas. If you are not prepared to accept advice then I don't see the point of wasting my time any further.
Peter
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On Sat, 14 Feb 2004 18:18:41 -0000, "Peter Taylor"

Numpty question time.....and really one relating to options for my kids after they leave school. Not that they've expressed interest in this career option but just so's I have a general idea of what's involved. I'm trying to keep them from deciding that a career in IT is worthwhile!
I wondered how one goes about become a surveyor (chartered or otherwise)? Does this involve degree education etc?
PoP
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PoP wrote

Hi PoP
This gets complex! As you know, there's all sorts of surveyors. Kitchen fitters, double glazing companies, damp-proofing specialists (etc etc) will all send their "surveyor" to see you. In fact anyone can call themselves a Surveyor. (Compare this with the term "Architect", which is protected by law for registered members of ARB).
But there are various organisations that surveyors can belong to via qualification, which gives them more credibility. I could list quite a few of these, but many have been, or are becoming, swallowed up by the RICS. So in very simple terms, the best way of knowing you are dealing with a properly qualified and expert surveyor is to make sure they have the RICS qualification FRICS or MRICS - ie a "Chartered Surveyor". This term is also protected.
Within the RICS membership there are all sorts of disciplines, just like there are all sorts of specialisations in medicine or law. These range from Minerals and Hydrographic (underwater) exploration, Town & Country Planning, Construction, the valuation, acquisition, management and disposal of property of all types and even auctioneering of farm animals and antiques. These different disciplines are divided into "Faculties" within the RICS organisation. I belong to the Building Surveying Faculty.
The standard route to qualification these days is via University. There are other ways, but they do take a while longer. Some people think this is sad, as it makes it difficult for youngsters with a practical background to qualify but, right or wrong, that's the way of the world. There is a Technician grade of membership now, which is gaining recognition.
Whatever route they follow or qualification they obtain, every Chartered Surveyor has to pass an Assessment of Professional Competence (APC). To do this they must have at least 2 years approved practical experience, prepare a diary and an in-depth summary of their knowledge and experience for approval, and also attend an interview with a panel of senior members. I was a chairman of one of these panels for 9 years.
I hope this was helpful. You can find out a lot more from the RICS itself. They have a Careers section on http://www.rics.org/careers and you can download their careers leaflet from http://www.rics.org/careers/RICSCareersBrochure.pdf
By all means email me if I can help any further.
Peter
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<snip>

become chartered with only 2 years approved practical experience? Seems a bit unfair on the 20 year man who does excellent work, but decided not to play the more paper for letters after the name game.
Every industry is different of course, but in mine, the chartered route is one reserved those who have given up on innovation and are ready for their pipe & slippers, and not the ones to rely on to deliver the goods.
My way to find the best in everything is by personal recommendation.
--
fred

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fred wrote

2 years is the minimum. We were talking about PoP's kids here Fred, there is a different route for more mature candidates. Also there are distance learning courses if you don't want to go to Uni.

That's certainly not the case with Chartered Surveyors. But innovation is the not necessarily the most important thing. Experience and the wisdom that comes with age are also in that bracket.

OK, but if everyone did that the world would stop. It needs one person to take the plunge with a new contact to be able to recommend in the first place. There are good and bad, able and less able in all walks of life. It's human nature.
Peter
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close to those made by those I don't hold in such a high regard as yourself, sorry . . .
In my field, electronics, innovation is everything :-! <nomex on>
--
fred

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Construction? They have never heard of the word!
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On Sun, 15 Feb 2004 08:53:22 -0000, "Peter Taylor"

Extremely helpful! Thank you for taking a few minutes to give such a detailed answer.
PoP
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Not so. There are systems architects in the computing industry.

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"IMM" wrote

Every time you argue with me you shoot yourself in the foot. You just make yourself look more and more stupid. The term Architect is protected by the Architects Act 1997, clause 20(1) of which states:
"A person shall not practise or carry on business under any name, style or title containing the word "architect" unless he is a person registered under this Act."
Clause 20(2) goes on "Subsection (1) does not prevent any use of the designation "naval architect", "landscape architect" or "golf-course architect"."
Peter
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I don't, I show you up.
You just make

Does that include "systems architects"?
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Not in the UK, there isn't. At least not legally.
Christian.
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It is an official job title in many companies, in the employment contract. Then jobs are advertised with the title. As with a building architect, he puts together an outline of the functionality and features a customers wants/needs. He goes as far as he can in specification. His work is used to price up on in many cases. Then people more specialist skills in certain areas take over: networking, databases, etc.
A building architect does similar; when designing a large building has to give the drawings to a structural engineer to see if it is feasible, a speciality he cannot do. Engineers regard the architect as the one who fixes the builings size, fuction, sizes the reception and gives colour schemes.
Looked at some IT jobs......
SOLUTIONS ARCHITECT - TYPE: Permanent LOCATION: North East SALARY: UP TO 100K + FLEXIBLE BENEFITS PACKAGE
DIRECTOR GLOBAL APPLICATIONS ARCHITECT TYPE: Permanent LOCATION: London (excl city) SALARY: COMPETITIVE POSTED: 10th February 2004
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Indeed. I said "at least not legally".
If any of the applicants for the job described themselves as an architect, then they are commiting an offence. The term comes from the US, where no such law exists. As you can see, enforcement in this country is less than total.
Christian.
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On Sat, 14 Feb 2004 18:18:41 -0000, "Peter Taylor"

Peter, while I think of it, my parents once had a house where there was evidence of damp in the outside walls arriving through some means.
They had a treatment done (IIRC, it was by Rentokil, although it may have been a subcontractor) which involved drilling holes almost through the (solid) wall in the mortar at about every third brick and chasing some mortar from along the front. A fairly chunky copper strip was inserted and then connected to a fairly serious earth rod.
It didn't require connection to an electricity supply.
The contractors also lowered the ground level outside, although there was no evidence of an earlier slate DPC.
The result was effective and no internal remedial work was required.
Have you come across this at all? Is there any science behind it or was it perhaps coincidence that lowering the ground level did the trick in some other way?
.andy
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Andy Hall wrote

Andy - I refer you to the answer I gave the honourable member SuzySue some moments ago! (On 19 Jan actually). As follows:
| SuzySue wrote | | > What about the method which I think is called "electro osmosis", where | > a cable is installed at the base of the wall and a small current which | > runs through the cable is supposed to prevent the rising damp. | > | > Is this a better and/or cheaper option? | | You might get better results by shouting at the wall and hitting it with a | branch like Basil Fawlty. Seriously, it is the least reliable of all | damp-proofing systems. Sometimes it works but nobody has been able to | understand why. In the vast majority of cases it doesn't. And don't be fooled | by sales pitch about active and passive systems - neither is better than the | other.
This is my own opinion about electro-osmosis systems - I have never specified it myself but I've inspected many buildings with it and only seen it effective once or twice. I have a brilliant book on various remedial treatments which gives a lot more info - if you like I can scan and email you some of the pages.
Peter
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On Sun, 15 Feb 2004 10:39:58 -0000, "Peter Taylor"

Thanks for the info Peter.
No it doesn't really matter. This was in the sixties and the work was done as a result of a building society survey. The same survey mandated that a meat safe be provided as well, we never understood why that was. THe DPC work had to be completed within three months of moving in
At any rate, I was never particularly convinced that there was much of a problem in the first place, but the walls never seemed damp.
It did seem a bit implausible that dumping the electric charge would prevent osmotic action through the bricks whcih was what the claim was. People would regularly ask what it was and how much electricity it used.
I remember that there was another system that some people had which involved drilling fairly large holes in the wall and inserting some kind of round ceramic affair. These were supposed to attract the moisture in some way and it then ran out. That also seemed a bit implausible.
.andy
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Aye, so was the guy who surveyed our house, and he couldn't have recognised a probelm if the house had fallen down a hole in the ground.

Practical experience rather than letters after my name.

Try standing a couple of bricks in a bowl of water and see what really happens instead of pontificating.
J.
--
John Rouse

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That is amazing, yet you know little about roofs and their insulation/condensation. Gasp!
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