Installing in a multifuel stove

I've been wondering this afternoon about putting a multifuel stove in my dining room. There is currently a large empty space in the fireplace where a hideous old gas fire with back boiler have been removed. The boiler had a flexible flue liner which still snakes up the chimney to the roof. Am I right in thinking that this existing liner will only be suitable for gas appliances and therefore will be no good for my stove (in which I plan to burn smokeless fuel)?
I'm hoping the answer is no (as the man in Machine Mart assured me) because I don't want to go stumbling about on the roof with ten meters of expensive wobbly steel piping, but I've come to accept that short cuts like reusing existing flue liners never seem to work out.
Martin
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Have a close look at it. Gas liners are normally single skinned where as for solid fuel you need a double skinned. The cost of the liner will probably be more than the stove.
I found it was not that hard a job to do myself, A roof ladder so I could get up easily and then sit aside th ridge. I did not need 10 metres as the first half meter from the stove is rigid flue pipe. You need someone down below pulling on a rope to help it down.
Usefuly links: http://www.aarrowfires.com http://www.focusstoves.co.uk http://www.stoveland.co.uk http://www.theheatstore.co.uk/home.asp http://www.woodstoveshop.co.uk http://www.morsostoves.co.uk http://www.tavistockgas.co.uk/woodburners.htm
On 17 Jan 2004 11:22:43 -0800, martin snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Martin Pentreath) wrote:

Lawrence
usenet at lklyne dt co dt uk
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I did mine, in a thick single skin. If I ever fit another I would hire a cherry picker. Technically its not hard, if you like standing on your chimney with a 6 metere long snake that wont bend, and is uncontrolable.
Rick
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martin snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Martin Pentreath) wrote in message

You could use the existing liner until it fails - might be several years and you get your monies worth. Then replace it if necessary.
cheers
Jacob
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(jacob) wrote in message

Thanks for the replies and links. I'm not totally sure what the purpose is of the double-skinned flue liner (which I don't have). Is it just for longevity or is there some sort of safety element in ensuring a better draw? If it is just that it lasts longer then I'm tempted to use the existing one as Jacob suggests until it gives up, but how will I know when it has given up?
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martin snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Martin Pentreath) wrote in message (jacob) wrote in message

It'll fail at the bottom where it joins the flue i.e. the hottest part. So you can take a look at it at intervals when you clean out the stove and flue.
I had a look at liners for our project and asked a few questions - all stainless steel liners will fail eventually - they are regarded as consumables with life of 5 - 20 years. So we went instead for the concrete solution - the whole chimney filled with light weight concrete with perlite filler - pumped in around a removable inflated tube. Cost 1000 - 15 metre flue - only slightly more than stainless steel when done by a contractor - but is specialised job and beyond diy. S/steel diy would have been about 600 plus lots of work - and perishable in the end. The concrete also binds the masonry, secures the chimney and fills gaps which was very useful in our old decrepit building.
cheers
Jacob
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We did the same with three chimneys. Works very well and very suited to our contorted chimney's.
Had the chimney's swept a couple of months ago after two seasons of use... only a couple of handfuls of soot came out. The sweep put it down to the linings - he had come across them before and was impressed by them. He was very scornful of stainless steel as he had had them collapse on him in the past - bit of a faff to get a builder in to extract your brushes from the chimney!
I think the lining contractor we used (Silver Lining) are no longer around. They were very knowledgeable and would recommend them.
BTW: Harridge Stoves (sp?) were the cheapest place we found to buy woodburners. They even deliver free.
Colin
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Aparently double skinned is two thin skins, you need (I am led to beleive) 1 thick skin.
I suggest you take profesional advice, you *SHOULD* do a building regs application if you reline.
Rick
On 18 Jan 2004 15:38:37 -0800, martin snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Martin Pentreath) wrote:

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Building regs say which liner you need, you mess arround with this, you may find insurance issues.
I suggest you phone hotline chimneys (on the web) the guy there helped me lots and lots .......
Rick
On 18 Jan 2004 05:50:57 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@jpbutler.demon.co.uk (jacob) wrote:

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