Indelible Marker pens

Hi all,
Where can I find the above? I'm after the type that you can flood the tip by pressing it in and they will write on anything. I seem to recall that Pentel used to make them, but I've drawn a blank so far
P.S. I don't want the paint type
TIA
--
--dave

snipped-for-privacy@nospam.org.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

lots.
They are not indelible though, even the permanent ones. The paint ones are the only really indelible ones.
--
Tim Mitchell

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave wrote on Wednesday (21/01/2004) :

Maplins Electronics and similar would probably sell them, they are used for circuit board layouts.
--

Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (Lap)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I hope I haven't offended against usenet in the way I changed the title, but what I've benn meaning to mention here for ages.
Does anyone remember indelible pencils?
When I were nobbut a lad, just after t'war, I remember these pencils that you licked, and they wrote in something like ink.
They also wrote if you didn't liick them.
They've disappeared, so I can't find out WTH they were *for*.
Were you supposed to lick them, or was the wetting effect an unfortunate side effect, or couldn't we get proper pencils with lots of leads inside which don't load when the old one is used?
Or were they meant to be used as pens? But fountain pens *had* been invented?
Anyone old enough to put me out of my misery, I lose sleep over this.
mike r
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

week.
--
Lawrence
College web Site "http://www.high-pavement-6th-form.ac.uk "
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 21 Jan 2004 19:16:25 +0000 (UTC), mike ring

Just about. Frequently a dark violet colour.

Laundry markers. You can still get them, but they're rare.
A similar thing is a Chinagraph pencil, which is still pretty common. They're very similar to use (they need a lick before they'll write straight off on a low-friction surface). Not indelible though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Used to be common in the days of tape editing. I'd have said the shiny back of some tape was a fairly low friction surface - as is glass - but I've never needed to lick one.
--
*When the going gets tough, use duct tape

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 21 Jan 2004 22:20:54 +0000 (GMT), Dave Plowman

Depends on the scale you're working at. If you restore fountain pen nibs, polyester / mylar tape is a useful abrasive.
If you're plotting on a map with a chinagraph (so it's removable) you lick the point - otherwise your mark doesn't start quite where you expected it to.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I gave up on the chinagraph for this purpose and started using thin tipped permanent markers. Provided your charts are laminated, it comes off with a bit of white spirit. The permanance is an advantage if you accidentally rub the chart with your arm in the cockpit and would otherwise wipe your route off it!
Christian.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, not like chinagraph, the laundry markers sounds right, though we were'nt posh enough to send t'laundry out.
I also STR that they poked down the spines of diaries or notebooks, and I wonder if the Ernest the Policeman licking his pencil when some feller me lamb had to have his name and address took had anything to do with it.
Please no remarks about Dennis the Dachshund licking his pencil from lewd fellows of the baser sort. :-)
mike r
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I once used one to trace the cause of a long-standing, recalcitrant Weather Radar system snag on a particular B707 aircraft.....
CRB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 21 Jan 2004 19:16:25 +0000 (UTC), mike ring

ISTR one of their advantages was they couldn't be erased .
Paul Mc Cann
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Try a search on the Viking stationary supplies site, I'd be surprised if they didn't have them
The Q
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave wrote:

I find that the silver and gold pens made by Pentel are very useful for permanently marking plastic items. I think that the ink uses Xylene as a solvent. They have a push-nib valve but, unfortunately, I have only been able to find those two colours. They are available in a couple of widths IIRC.
HTH Richard
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That's my main use for them.
But make sure they do use xylene. Most of them have now switched to a water-based formula and these are useless as any-surface markers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's a general rule that the dangerous stuff works the best. The Xylene pens have "contents may be fatal if swallowed". That's what I call an endorsement!
--
Bob Mannix
(anti-spam is as easy as 1-2-3 - not)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.