Improvised Angle drill

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Maplin sell a drill speed controller kit for 19.99 - VE90. You'll also need a box and input output cables/sockets etc. It works very well, but may not reduce the speed of an angle grinder sufficiently for some drilling applications.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Never looked back since buying my De Walt DW160 dumpy drill about 4 years ago.
Basically it is a cylinder c. 90mm dia with a sideways on chuck. Back side of drill to tip of closed chuck is around 110mm. It has solved an enormous no awkward drilling problems & not just between joists. Where necessary I use cut down spade bits - so you can drill a 1 in hole in joist gaps of only 150-170mm.
No more angled/fiddled holes.
Main snag is that it is only c. 300W & mono-speed, so it is not a replacement for a regular power drill. Also you have to be careful to switch off at plug when leaving it as the switch is on the side of the body & can turn on by the drill's own weight or an accidental knock.
Mine came from the late lamented BMJ Power (ex B&D service centre), but B&Q were selling it as well. Paid around gbp130 - bit pricey but for shear convenience, unbeatable.
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On Tue, 17 Feb 2004 01:14:18 +0000 (GMT), Dave Plowman

I built a speed controller years ago (don't think it was a Maplin kit) so my mate could use his big angle grinder as a car polishing mop. It had pretty good torque control. It would would work VERY slowly and was still pretty unstoppable?
It has only failed once (in the 10 years since I built it for him) when the noise filter in the IEC socket failed. I replaced it with a non filtered socket and off it went again ;-)
All the best ..
T i m
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I found that my ordinary drill wouldn't go slow enough for some things - even in low gear. I suppose the lowest it would go was about 200 rpm or so - any slower and the motor started to smell. That's why I'm not sure an electronic speed control would reduce the speed of an angle grinder sufficiently to drill safely.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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London SW 12

why go to all the trouble when you can pick up stuff like this for £8
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item#80329817&category03
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wrote:

Most tool stalls have these for around £10.
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snipped-for-privacy@easy.com says...

As this one: http://makeashorterlink.com/?O22461277
The adaptor is a good idea though, since I have an angle grinder with a soft start and electronic speed control (doubles for polishing). Unfortunately, all the spare chucks I have are female thread (and not M14...) It would allow use of old "drill" attachments and chucks though, so count me in for one.
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John (remove nospam to mail)

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says...

By the time you buy an angle grinder with a soft start, speed control, check, have the adaptor made, etc, you may as well buy a main angle drill. I have seen them for 3112 on the web.
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That's the starting price. With 3.50 postage. And have you ever used one? They're dreadfully unwieldy.
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*I just got lost in thought. It was unfamiliar territory.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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On Wed, 18 Feb 2004 01:17:03 +0000 (GMT), Dave Plowman

[T] I think the idea is with these electronic speed controllers you get nearly the same 'torque' as you would at full speed. What you don't get of course is the intertia gained from such revs? I know my D-Walt battery drill on low speed will twist the head off a No8 screw at pretty low revs (AC-DC the concept is the same?).
I have a Lathe, soldering iron and spare cheap mini grinder so might give it a try .. ;-)
All the best ..
T i m
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What you don't get is the cooling from the motor fan. With low-speed high-torque applications, like a polishing or brushing with an angle grinder, the motor will tend to run hot if it's run at low speeds. Care, cooling pauses, and maybe running it at full speed and no load ever so often prevent motor damage.
Thomas Prufer
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But I'd say that starting torque isn't quite the same as constant speed running. You might have to use full power on your screwdriver to do this which would result in full speed running light.
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*The most wasted day of all is one in which we have not laughed.*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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On Wed, 18 Feb 2004 13:48:19 +0000 (GMT), Dave Plowman

[T] True ;-)
You might have to use full power on your screwdriver to do this

[T] Possibly, unless the 'screwdriver' was powerfull and had good feeback in it's controller then it would run the same speed on or off load (that's sort of the point of the 'speed controller' .. it maintains the 'speed' (RPM) by applying more or less 'power' as needed) ?
All the best ..
T i m
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Dave Plowman wrote:

And if you need a really crude and nasty speed reduction for a tool, stick a rectifier diode in serise with the live. Runs it half wave so don't expect smooth controled torque ;-)
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Cheers,

John.

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On Mon, 16 Feb 2004 20:31:44 +0000 (UTC), "Andrew Mawson"

[T] Funny, I might have a job that could involve drilling a couple of holes to mount a waterproof junction box in the gap between two house extensions and was looking at angle drills ... ;-) (I cound get a couple of plugs in and use a stubby screwdriver or even a 1/4" drive socket set)
So is the 35mm 'connector' is as short as possible to take both the studs witout them touching in the middle (as such)?
Do they make an angle grinder with an 'easy' on/off switch? Both of mine have a fairly 'locky' slide type switch? Using it as a drill I would think a drill type trigger might be safer (given the choice?).
Nice little job for the Myford ML10 eh ;-)
All the best ..
T i m
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