IMM fodder

Page 15 of 16  
Dave Plowman wrote:

What a load of crap. Propaganda is a cheap war weapon so we should make full use of it.... The 3rd rate nations milk it for all its worth, why shouldn't we?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Do you actually read anything before commenting?
--
*The colder the X-ray table, the more of your body is required on it *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
BillR wrote:

But war itself is not at all cheap. Proganda should be used as a wepaon, not to justify the use of them.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

is so to speak
--
geoff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

advertise SCOT and other bits of kit.
--
geoff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've been on Sheffield (as was) before it got used for target practice by the argies. Type 42.
I heard an interesting story back in the days of the Falklands. Apparently in the war theatre ships like Sheffield are put on "picket duty" in front of and to protect the carriers, to pick up and deal with any incoming. That's why Sheffield was in harms way.
Sheffield was equipped with Sea Wolf missiles. Basically Sea Wolf is capable of bringing down an incoming missile, and could of dealt with an exocet quite easily. Sheffield had the means to defend itself.
Unfortunately when the UK went to war they forgot to inform the onboard computer systems on Sheffield that Exocet was to be considered a hostile missile. It's manufactured in France which is part of the NATO pact. You don't expect your friends to be firing on you so any Exocet which is in the sky can't be coming your way.
All junk put into the sky has a radar footprint which allows it to be identified, so Sheffields radar picked up the Exocet. But the computers said "friendly missile" and didn't engage it. The plan was that the Exocet would fly past Sheffield towards another target.
The ops room (where the missile went thru) apparently had 3 seconds warning that they were about to be wiped out. Too late for Sea Wolf to engage. Must've been a dreadful experience for those in the ops room seeing death coming straight at them.
Subsequently no further ships were lost to long range Exocet during the conflict - the onboard computer systems were updated to advise that it was a hostile missile which should be engaged.
Computer programmers, don't you luv 'em? ;)
PoP
Sending email to my published email address isn't guaranteed to reach me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PoP wrote:

Yes PoP, you are correct there.
It was the missiles radar transmission that made it a "friendly". Afore the op's room was the seadart storage. The huge fireball was the result of the exocet motor smashing into them and lighting up the kerosene. As seadart is a ramjet missile. The warhead itself did not blow up. It was a dud. The resulting fire is what burned That young South Wales fella. I forget his name.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Are you sure you are not mixing up the Sheffield and the Galahad?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's funny how all the self declared experts stand up only to fail down with a thump...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I think he may be. Simon Weston was the name he may have been thinking of:
http://www.westonspirit.org.uk/charity_aboutus/simon.html
You really have to give this guy some respect for having come through this.
PoP
Sending email to my published email address isn't guaranteed to reach me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Sheffield was not. It had Sea Dart. Wolf was only on the type 23s.

1/5 of the Exocet was British made.

Atlantic Conveyor, although unarmed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
IMM wrote:

Blimey IMM gets it right. Close to HMS Arrow on the fateful day (A Type 21 which had Sea Cat)

But the Type 23 was not in the South Atlantic, only on drawing boards. So nearly right, try Type 22s. When HMS Sheffield was struck the Type 22 frigates HMS Brilliant and HMS Broadsword were assisting the carrier HMS Hermes and cvs HMS Invincible, using the close defence Sea Wolf. HMS Sheffield was 20 miles away. It's Sea Dart system, unlike the Sea Cat and Sea Wolf systems, was not really a close defence system, but a high speed high altitude missile & had successfully taken out Argentinean surveillance aircraft at altitude of almost 40,000 feet. It's beam tracking guidance was not really suited to surface skimming threats.

Not true at all. The UK knew all about the limited number of Argentinean Exocets, down to the serial numbers. The radar on a Type 42 had less detailed resolution than that of other ships in the task force. The Sheffield was operating closer to the coast than most of the task force, it's radar subject to clutter from the mainland. The ship was not in a full state of preparedness and it had not had information about the threat passed on to it from HMS Invincible which had been tracking the incoming aircraft.

damaged when attacked by them for the third time.
--
Toby.

'One day son, all this will be finished'
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

I am always right.

I was only one out.

Sheffield had it radar off as it was used to talk to London. the radar interfered with the satellite link to London. That is what it was unable to launch chaff deflecting rockets. Another Leander class ship did see the exocets and launched chaff.
The Sheffield was lucky hit. The Exocet was a poor missile. Hit the Sheffield by more luck than anything and did not sink her. The desastation was due to the poor design of the ship. Hit the unarmed Atlantic Conveyor and the Glamorgan was hit from the land, saw it, although alittle too late, turned stern on and survived.
The British fleet was equipped with Sea Eagle which had (from memory) 3 times the range, twice the speed and twice the TNT. The Argies pissed off rather than engage the British fleet. Very wise, as many mothers sons are still here.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Which proves the first statement does it not?
PoP
Sending email to my published email address isn't guaranteed to reach me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yep.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
geoff wrote:

hero's would not get a war pension.
The Belgrano would of fought given the opportunity. They did not declare any boundary. Nor considered our fleet so dangerous.
I have a query. If we are in "NATO", why was the falklands not part of it? Yet "NATO" sorted out Yugoslavia with no hesitation..... Even though they painted all our ships "NATO" white! --Tossers!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Perhaps 'North Atlantic Treaty Organisation' gives clue? ;-)
--
*Never kick a cow pat on a hot day *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PoP wrote:

Soldiers got killed in a war zone.... so what? Yes there may have been a logistics problem, wars have been lost on such issues but these are not normal business supply situations...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Charming. So El Presidente makes up a story to put our troops in a war theatre, and lives are thrown away fighting in a conflict which should not have taken place.
You must be a real source of comfort for wives and children that have lost a loved one.

Cobblers. War is as much a manufacturing/supply process as any other process. There's nothing particularly special about supplying to a war theatre that sets it aside from regular resource planning activities. You have a list of materials, supply route (and backup routes), and knowledge of the time to ship. That allows you to plan the process to deliver the materials at the point where they are needed.
PoP
Sending email to my published email address isn't guaranteed to reach me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I must say, they chose to join the forces, conscription when out about 40 years ago, sign on that dotted line and you accept that you might end up offering the ultimate sacrifice. In saying that, you are quite correct when you say any such conflict / war should be justified (and time will tell if it was - time is running out Mr Blair....).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.