Icy weather

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I hope everyone has topped up with antifreeze and that includes their wiper washers. Use a mix of alcohol and water to free the windows of frost. Squirty bottles at the ready. Don't forget to give the bonnet a going over before you drive off too.
See that all know where the stop tap is for the water in your house and make sure you do the decent thing with your elderly neighbours. Never leave them lying in the street.
--
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<snip>
You / are / joking I hope, unless you want problems with the vehicles paint work don't ever (even diluted) radiator anti-freeze into your washer bottle.
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Jerry. wrote:

I assume he is meaning using washer fluid containing an anti-freeze - not radiator antifreeze!
D
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Well that is what he said, what he / meant / might well have been what you suggest (and I suspect he meant that also) but there are many who seeing his message might just do as he suggested literally - hence the warning...
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Health and safety advice? A trip hazard??

--
-- Bill

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writes

I was thinking more of the little old ladies.
We dont want to encourage people to steal steal them and paint their coats red and their legs white and put fishing rods in their hands for the duration do we?
--
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On Sun, 25 Jan 2004 22:37:01 +0000 (UTC), "Michael McNeil"

You start doing that and these little old ladies with fishing rods will be sending postcards from around the world!
PoP
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Copied from the Met Office website:
Here is an ADVANCED WARNING of severe weather affecting Scotland, Northern Ireland, England and Wales, issued by the Met Office at 09:36 on Sunday, 25 January 2004. This warning is the second update to that issued at 09:00 on Friday 23 January 2004.
Much colder weather will begin to spread south across the country on Monday and the Met Office is expected substantial snowfall in some areas. Accumulations exceeding 10cm are likely in places with drifting where strong northerly winds develop. It is still difficult to predict where the heaviest falls will occur, but the risk remains greater from Tuesday onwards. Eastern and northern areas appear most at risk, and there is a risk of exceptionally severe conditions with accumulations of more than 15cm. Dangerous driving conditions are expected and some untreated roads are likely to become impassable.
For inquires regarding this warning - please contact your regional Met Office. Transmitted by the Met Office, at 09:36 on Sunday 25 January
This warning will be updated around 09:00 tomorrow Monday 26 January 2004.
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forecast to do structural damage, that the Met Office helpfully 'warned' us of a couple of weeks ago :-) This will be a good test of South Centrals new trains. Last week the 17:52 London Bridge to Bognor stopped just south of Billingshurst 3 days on the trot because the 'computer had crashed' ('Sorry folks, bear with us while the train is rebooted' - which took longer than win 2K)
--
Andrew

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Michael McNeil wrote:

Good point. I'm going away for a week. Should I leave the heating on constant?
--
Ben Blaney
Must try harder
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wrote:

There are really two options available:
1) Fit a frost stat. These override the time clock of a CH system if the temperature drops below a preset minimum (which you set like a regular room thermostat - 2-5 degrees is typical but others like it a bit higher). That way you don't have to worry about updating the time clock - the heating will fire up based entirely on the prevailing temperature within the building (at least, in the room where the frost stat is located).
2) Leave the CH on 24x7, but wind down the room thermostat to say 10-15 degrees.
PoP
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PoP wrote:

I'll do this. Cheers.
--
Ben Blaney
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Ben Blaney wrote on Sunday (25/01/2004) :

Leave your heating on, just turn the thermost down to 5C.
--

Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (Lap)
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Harry Bloomfield wrote:

ta
--
Ben Blaney
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Then, when you come back, it will take days for the house to warm up and much of the savings you made by leaving the heating turned down will be lost as you re-heat the structure of the house.
Colin Bignell
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If Ben lives in a stone-built castle with walls 15 feet thick maybe, but then it would take days to cool down too. A modern well-insulated house made of ticky-tacky with much lower thermal capacity will feel warm again within an hour.
But I agree 5C is too low if the weather is really cold. With 5 air temp at the roomstat there are bound to be many other places in the house where the temp is below zero. It might be enough to protect the rads and boiler, but the header tank, rising main and cold water tank in the loft are extremely vulnerable and any deadlegs on the hot and cold water services could also be at risk. Also, with all the windows closed there's no ventilation and the vapour from those last-minute showers and damp towels will be condensing everywhere, maybe turning to ice on windows. I would feel much safer with a min. setting of about 12 to 15. Let's hope it doesn't happen, like Andrew's gales.
Peter
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On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 08:02:21 -0000, Peter Taylor wrote:

I once made the mistake of switching the heating of here and it did take days for the place to become comfortable again, stone built but only 18" thick. The heating now stays on 365 days/year.

Our place was warm within the normal couple of hours it just wasn't comfortable as the stone sucked the heat out of the air and caused even more cool drafts than normal.
The (unoccupied) barn has it's room stat set at around 8C. There is a frost stat as well at about 4C, which kept the frost out of the tanks/pipework with -10C or lower outside. The 8C room stat is used now as that keeps the damp at bay better.

And whats the problem with that? Every winters night with a half decent frost when I was a lad I'd be succking an (old) penny and sticking onto the ice to melt a hole in the window ice to peer through. Central heating makes people soft.

That's cool winter bedroom temps! Whimps.
--
Cheers snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com
Dave. pam is missing e-mail
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----- Original Message -----
Newsgroups: uk.d-i-y Sent: Monday, January 26, 2004 10:41 PM Subject: Re: Icy weather
On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 08:02:21 -0000, Peter Taylor wrote:

I once made the mistake of switching the heating of here and it did take days for the place to become comfortable again, stone built but only 18" thick. The heating now stays on 365 days/year.

Our place was warm within the normal couple of hours it just wasn't comfortable as the stone sucked the heat out of the air and caused even more cool drafts than normal.
The (unoccupied) barn has it's room stat set at around 8C. There is a frost stat as well at about 4C, which kept the frost out of the tanks/pipework with -10C or lower outside. The 8C room stat is used now as that keeps the damp at bay better.

And whats the problem with that? Every winters night with a half decent frost when I was a lad I'd be succking an (old) penny and sticking onto the ice to melt a hole in the window ice to peer through. Central heating makes people soft.

That's cool winter bedroom temps! Whimps.
-- Cheers snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com Dave. pam is missing e-mail
I agree with that all Dave. I'm 2 young for the old penny but used to melt a face shape with fingertips. I had a bedroom with no central heating and old rattly sash windows that "you could drive a horse and cart" through the gap between them.
We have a Rayburn Royal which was on all the time apart from 2 weeks in the middle of the middle of summer when we'd be away. It took about a week for the 3 foot thick stone walls to stop absorbing heat at a great rate - and that was summer time.
In a modern house I'd say keep the same temperature but reduce the hours it is on to say 6 hours in the middle of the night. If you do switch it off, get a neighbour/friend to switch it on full for 24 hours before you arrive home.
Suzanne
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LOL - I can remember that too. A paraffin heater in the hall, and if we had some coal there might be enough hot water for bath night on Fridays from the back boiler.if you're lucky. Later on we had a gas copper in the scullery for doing the washing, and I used to take a bucket of boiling water upstairs to the frozen bathroon. (No thermal mixers in those days!) The wallpaper in my bedroom used to peel off at the top every winter and hang down, then every spring we would stick it back again. Do you remember the big freeze of 62/63?
The point is, if it's cold enough to freeze condensation on the windows then the water pipes are in danger of freezing too and I wouldn't feel confident about the pipes in the loft if I left the house for a week with the stat at just 5C. Pipe and tank insulation doesn't protect static water from freezing - it just slows down the rate of cooling.
Peter
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Harry Bloomfield retched Icy weather onto my recliner:

Down? Christ you must be ill or something.
--

Phil K.

http://philkyle2003.reachme.at /
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