I LOVE Speedfit!

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On Sat, 2 Aug 2003 13:12:55 +0100, "David W.E. Roberts"

My 1930s semi had a Servowarm system fitted when there was a shortage of copper, and it was done in steel. Some of it has now been replaced with copper as we have moved stuff around, and I was pleased to see that the bits of steel pipe cut off appear to be in pretty good condition. I had been told that it *will* fail, and that any plumber brave enough to try adding to it will have great difficulty and end up replacing most of it. Thankfully, this appears to not be the case, but I keep an eye on it anyway.
Regards,
Colin Swan Nildram Operations
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Colin Swan <colin AT nildram DOT net> wrote:

Iron barrel was used for piping water and gas before copper became common. With a central heating system there should be no air in the water, so no corrosion. But an inhibitor would stop this anyway.
Its modern equivalent is electrical conduit so the skills to form it etc still exist, although not, I'd guess, with the average plumber.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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common.
Dave, I think you are unfamiliar with the steel pipe which was used as a get-you-by for a while. This is thin wall stuff (about 1mm or less) with the same dimensions as copper so it could be fitted using the same fittings both compression and soldered. Some is still around in reasonably well protected systems which have been kept up to strength with corrosion inhibitors but some alas is suffering from the effects of corrosion and is failing. Corroded pipe is a bitch to try to connect to and it is better to rip it out and replace wherever possible. Perhaps the stuff you are thinking of is good old fashioned thick wall steel pipe jointed by screwing or welding? About the same time a lot of continental copper pipe was imported to overcome the shortages but which seems to have had particles of some corrodible metal in it. Over the years these have corroded away and formed pinholes. The trade used it in good faith and found out afterwards what crap it really was. Some lengths had one particle in them somewhere and some lengths have revealed a great number of them which produces, eventually, something akin to a watering can spreader bar for putting weedkiller on the lawn!
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<snip>
formed
Also known as "what is that hissing noise and why is the floor wet?" :-(
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There was some shennigans in Africa and pipe was made in half thickness until supplies were restored. It definitely wasn't the time to be installing central heating or rewiring.
Christian.
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as
Yes.
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Speedfit has its advantages, but under floor boards I would still rather have a soldered joint. Mind you, I wouldn't trust compression fittings under boards either. I love speedfit as well but last year I used some 22mm speedfit tank connectors and the pipes kept leaking unless the pipe was totally square to the fitting. After much headache I ended up having to use compression fittings. I'm going to be running some speedfit in a couple of bathrooms soon but am going to make sure that any connections are not boxed in. Another thing that concerns me is the super seal pipe insert with the extra rubber seal - why is this needed if the normal connection is so good?
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StealthUK wrote:

Do you mean the grey tank connectors?
I used JG SpeedFit throughout my house, and had no leaks at all, except from the tank connector - which *wasn't made by JG* - they are made by someone else, and they are truly crap. The O-ring is nearly a mm too big (and no, they aren't sold as imperial connectors).
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Of the systems widely available I settled on Hep20 which I believe became Marley Equator. I didn't feel that others were quite as well engineered - recently in the local B and Q the (independent) plumber bloke in there said B and Q have now apparently classified Equator as the top quality although they also stock Speedfit and the copper pushfit range as well.
Of the problems I have had (almost none) was some plastic swarf over the o ring in a fitting which dripped once every 10 minutes and joints where the pipes was so badly and deeply scored that I couldn't believe would have a chance of sealing and all but two did - very impressed overall
Nick
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No so. two separate companies and systems.

In B&Qs they stock Speedfit and Polyplumb. In B&Q Warehouses they also stock Equator. I find Equator well priced.
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The Hepworth engineer went to Marley and evolved Equator.....
Nick
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Maybe, but still two separate systems and companies. He obviously designed out the bulkiness of Hep2o, as Equator is much smaller and neater.
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Is that its only claim to fame?
I quite like the features that Speedfit has of the option of a pipe insert with an extra O-ring seal and the twist-lock ring. The pipe insert is also said to enable the joint to be stabilised against any sideways forces which might happen if the pipe is being fed through an awkward place. The twist lock is in addition to the normal metal mechanical securing method. It appears that Equator, from the data sheets at least, is similar technology to Hep2o.
As far as appearance is concerned, Speedfit strikes me as a bit less lumpy in appearance than Hep2o. However, none of the plastic solutions would win 10 in the Monopoly beauty contest, would they?
.andy
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
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Are they sold by Speedfit?
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IMM wrote:

No, but they are sold by B&Q and many plumbers merchants, and very often shelved with the SpeedFit range.
Having said that, ScrewFix are now listing the tank connector under the SpeedFit range, so presumably those ones are SpeedFit.
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You say "presumably".
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Some developers are experiencing far too many call backs on leaks. Some leaks are intermittent in that they leak when hot and re-seal when cool.
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No, it was copper pipe I was using into the push-fit tank connectors causing the problem. I think if I had used plastic I would have got away with it. The greater rigidity of the copper pipe made it harder to work with as it was not 100% square and created a greater side force.
About to re-route the pipes from the tank now using 22mm plastic pipe (After spending ages sorting the copper originally). Will let you know how I get on.

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wrote in message news:<bgg67d$hq8>

on
are
it
professionals
If you used copper pipe and brass push-fit the problem would not happen. If a copper pipe is slightly ovalled it will round up as it enters the rigid brass fitting.
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