How to fit lead flashing into brickwork?

This is hopefully a simple one
I may have to replace some woodwork over a window which has lead flashing folded over it at the top
The lead flashing is set into the mortar between courses of bricks and folds down by around 3" vertically over the wood.
So my question is :-
How is the flashing usually fitted between the bricks? I'm assuming it is inserted where the mortar joint would be by a couple of inches and fixed in place using some kind of adhesive/sealant - Is this correct.
I'm planning on removing the old stuff and then angle grinding the joint to open it up to fit new - Would this be a typical way of doing it?
Any advice on this or recommended materials would be appreciated.
Thanks
R
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More usually by about an inch, and jammed in place at intervals by scraps of folded lead. Then simply pointed over. You need to make sure it can't move until the mortar sets.
--
*You can't have everything, where would you put it?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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I saw a really good builder doing this a few years ago. He just raked out the pointing to a good depth, using a power drill. Then he replaced the lead, and it seemed to just stay put until he had pointed it in. Work of art.
HTH
Geoff

folds
in
to
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Is this adhesive any good for fixing lead flashings in?
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?id 161
Thanks for any more advice
R
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folds
in
to
Remove the mortar with a plugging chisel or a rotary rake in a drill.
A lip, minimum of 25mm, should be should be inserted into the cleaned out joint.
The usual method of holding flashing in place is to cut some lead strips 25mm wide. Roll/fold these over to make lead wedges and drive these into the joint using the plugging chisel. Then re-point the joint, or use Lead Mate
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In my 1900 house, tiny wooden wedges were used which I found just under the surface of the pointing when racking out. When I repointed and redressed the lead into the brickwork, I used the same wedges, which hadn't gone the least bit rotten.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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The normal way to hold the lead into the groove in the morter is to make some small wedges from the offcuts of the lead and use these to pin the lead in to the brick work. Just use the wegdes on the underside of the lead and them fold the lead over and it hides the wedges.I have heard that you can get some sort of glue ( lead mate?) but ive always used the method above I found that using a plugging chisel is just as quick as an angle grinder and much less mess. Another tip is use platination oil on the lead as this prevents the lead discolouring and staining the brick work / window. hope this helps Rob
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This might work with a straight run, but I'd say it near impossible with stepped flashing. The wedges should be driven in far enough for the mortar to cover anyway.
I'd recommend that when starting doing this sort of work you fashion up the entire length on the workbench or at least on the ground, as trying to do it in situ given that this is normally a roof isn't ideal - at least for the likes of me.
--
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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