How much light for a garage?

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Hi folks,
I will shortly be introducing my (detached) garage to the wonders of modern electricity. Short of trial and error, does anyone know of a good rule of thumb for deciding how much light and heat is required per m^2? The garage is only slightly larger than a car, and will be used for tinkering and storage (but not of cars), and perhaps the odd bit of tumble-drying.
Part of me wants to say "3 strip lights and a 3kW heater", but I can't help thinking there must be a more scientific way.
I guess it would be nice to know this in general, since my whole house appears to be underlit and underheated.
TIA, Rich
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You will need additional light in a garage compared to living spaces, as they are invariably used as working areas. For a simple 4.8m x 2.4m garage, a twin tube 58W fitting would provide oodles. 3 singles spaced throughout would be even better, but might be over the top, depending on what you wanted to use the room for.
As for heating, it is more important to get the insulation sorted than increase the heater power. If you can spare 50mm of every wall, it is well worth sticking some slabs of celotex on. Draft proof and insulate the door too. (Don't forget the ceiling!) Then, 3kW will be well overpowered for the garage (although it will get it to temperature quickly). A wall mounted convector with timer and THERMOSTAT (essential!) would be inobtrusive, quiet and effective.
Christian.
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Also, usually, garages have dark walls and ceilings, darker than those typically found in a house anyway. Fluorescent fittings are so cheap that you might as well go abit OTT.
--
Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

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snipped-for-privacy@isbd.co.uk writes

Indeed.
I have fluorescent fittings ( 4 'bulbs' - 2 are old single 4 ft fittings, one is a modern twin 58W fitting) in my garage and while for general use it's ok, it's not quite enough IMO. particularly at each end. Though possibly I could have arranged them slightly better
Doing it from scratch I'd probably have 4 twin fittings - that ought to do It :-)
Painting the walls white would probably help as well, we painted our shed white inside and it really made it seem brighter inside.
--
Chris French, Leeds

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On Mon, 1 Dec 2003 13:20:02 +0000, chris French

Could I add my support for that idea too! Thanks to someone who was very helpful with that suggestion a couple of months ago I splashed some white paint on the garage walls and it did indeed make a big difference.
PoP
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It does help, considerably.
Until you put up floor to ceiling shelves, racks and cupboards ...
Mary

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Well yes :-)
Paint all the boxes etc. on the shelves white as well?
--
Chris French, Leeds

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chris French wrote:

Dangle white sheets over the fronts of the racks, keeps the light levels up and the dust off.
--
James...
http://www.jameshart.co.uk /
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Can't find anything, mind ...
--
"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
The uk.transport FAQ; http://www.huge.org.uk/transport/FAQ.html
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On Mon, 1 Dec 2003 19:19:43 +0000, chris French

... or stick white roses on them ??
.andy
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
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mad snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Rich) wrote in message

Hi
I'd make it one 5' fluorescent light plus a white ceiling to soften the light. More enthusiastic folk might run to 2 strips, but 3.... no, just plain unpleasant.
Regards, NT
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N. Thornton wrote:

In my workshop (approx single garage sort of size) I went for 4 x 5' 58W single tubes - one on each end wall, two equally spaced in the middle. With the ceiling and walls painted off-white I find these give a nice even light for working in.
It's not just the level of light that counts - but also having it arriving from several directions so that you are not always working in your shadow.
(when I installed the lights I put them on a double switch so that I could switch two pairs of two independently - I have so far never found the desire to only use one set on its own when working in there - although being able to switch only half on is OK when you are just popping out to get a tool or something).
--
Cheers,

John.

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Ouch. :)

Yes. Mounting a light in the middle of the ceiling, bulb pointing down, is not good. Mounting it the other way up with a white painted ceiling helps a lot. If you go for multiple lights, the best option is to mount them on the wall high up, with tube shielded from view, and the light bouncing off the ceiling and upper wall. Trough or shelf.
Fl lights last so long that the tubes need to be cleaned occasionally, or the light output falls a lot. Stay well away from 'cool white' tubes.

I'd definitely recommend that.
Regards, NT
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N. Thornton wrote:
I just mounted up 4 35W single fluro tubes in my loft - about 28 meters long (L bend in teh middle) and 4.5meters wide.
Its adequate to see what you are doing. Not enough for close detailed work tho.
If that helps. Works out at 1W per square meter.
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N. Thornton wrote:

Something else I forgot mention - it is well worth going for a fitting that has a nice tight fitting diffuser. Not only will this make the light nicer to work in, and keep the dust of the tubes, but more importantly it has saved a tube on a number of occasions when I have been rotating a large bit of stock and forgot that it was longer than the height of the lights!
--
Cheers,

John.

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<snip>

<snip>
a
If you are planning to have a lathe, pillar drill or things that turn, an ordinary light bulb of some sort would be a must IMO, last thing you need is to be lulled into thinking something has stopped when it is still turning.
This was last demonstrated to me by an old metalwork teacher, oh so many moons ago. I think it is based around the same principal shown in old movies when the wheels on a car give the idea of being stopped or going in the opposite direction, when they are really going forward. -- Big Al - The Peoples Pal
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On Tue, 2 Dec 2003 00:57:53 -0000, "Big Al - The Peoples Pal"

Something to do with harmonic frequency no doubt. That is, if the light is flickering at 50Hz and the power tool is rotating at some direct multiple of that (say 200Hz) then it will appear to be still as your eye is getting the rotating tool or chuck snapshot in the same position each time.
PoP
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PoP wrote:

The flicker rate is double mains freq - 100hz. Long persistence phosphors help a lot. The ones I put in today are not bad at all. However, I would still not use em arond totating machinery.

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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

IMBW but I was under the impression that modern fl lights had high frequency ballasts to eliminate this problem? I must admit to never having observed the effect myself in my workshop which is all fl lighting and I am usually very sensitive to flicker (find 50Hz TV quite objectionable for example).
Then again I can usually tell when a tool is running due to the noise!
--
Cheers,

John.

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