Hidden control switches for kitchen appliances?

The following appeared in the course of another topic, but I think it warrants a separate thread.

Then Stefek replied:
I'm pretty sure, but don't claim to be authoritative, that the switches are supposed to be accessible. The full-on answer would depend on the function the switches are considered to be performing: if emergency shutoff, then visible-and-accessible; if isolation, less accessible would be permitted. Let's use common sense here: definitely one of the reasons you want the switches is to cut power to your cooking appliance if something catches fire on it or in it. Then you want to be able to cut the power PDQ alongside doing Other Sensible Things (covering with well-dampened towel, for example) - and the "you" might just be Auntie Mabel cooking lunch for all of you. Hence the requirement for the switch to be in plain view and close by - i.e. I'd think long and hard about pretending a cooking appliance isolator does *not* have any emergency switching function.
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Now, what Stefek is saying does seem to make good sense. However, you know all those fancy designer kitchens you see in magazines (well some magazines)? You rarely see a plug socket above the worktop, never mind a socking great cooker control switch / fuse unit to ruin their beautiful (expensive) design. Where do they put them? Or do they have hoardes of servants to deal with Auntie Mabel's mishaps?
Thanks. Mike
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wrote:

Interesting thoughts....
However, if the oven or hob is gas, then the fact that the nearest isolator could be the emergency control valve on the gas meter that could be locked away in the garage or an outside meter cupboard seems to negate your reasoning.
I would say the switches are for isolation rather than emergency use.
I have used 'hidden' switching throughout my wife's new kitchen, mainly because I used 'very hard' porcelain tiles that were a right pig to cut without stress cracking. I resorted to a diamond blade in my angle grinder in the end, but that's another story.
Hope that sheds some light on it,
Bob
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wrote:

A good point. There is a gas control valve near(ish) to where our gas hob will be, but I'm going to put a socking great pan drawer unit in front which will conceal it nicely to render it useless in case of an emergency. Well, the drawers will of course be removeable, so I'm hoping it's not going to offend against some gas regulation (I'm also hoping I won't have to put a big sticker on the front of the drawer to comply).
By the way, did you "hide" your switching at the back of a nearby base/wall cabinet so as still to be reasonably accessible even if not instantly visible?
Mike
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Michael Brewer wrote:

The one for our hob is in the cupboard under it which is full of crockery. There's no sticker on the door either you'll be pleased to know and our house was built by a reputable national house builder - ha bloody ha. I was in the loft the other week and noticed that the wiring for the recessed spots in the bathroom had lots of joints wrapped up with insulating tape. It doesn't feel like there are any "chocolate blocks" inside so I'm guessing the wires are just twisted together - quick, where's my NHBC warranty ;-)

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"Michael Brewer" wrote | Now, what Stefek is saying does seem to make good sense. However, | you know all those fancy designer kitchens you see in magazines | (well some magazines)?
You're not talking about Gentleman Shed-Owner's Quarterly here are you?
| You rarely see a plug socket above the worktop, never | mind a socking great cooker control switch / fuse unit to ruin their | beautiful (expensive) design. Where do they put them?
You never see grease up the walls or black streaks where the broccoli boiled dry either, nor muddy foot-prints on the lino and wrinkled wallpaper where the cat missed the litter tray.
| Or do they have hoardes of servants to deal with Auntie Mabel's mishaps?
I suspect that Auntie Mabel has been sent, along with her Baby Belling and slightly leaky commode, to a "Home" somewhere in The North where the price is cheaper.
Owain
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