Help - washing machine won't drain!

My washing machine won't drain - where do I look first? There's a filter at the bottom. If it isn't that, is it internal, or just the exit pipe is clogged? Can I pour that fould drain cleaning fluid in to it or should I - groan - pull the damn thing out (it's heavy) and look round the back? What's the basic fault-finding process? Thank you for helping me avoid BO! Andy
=== Andy Evans ==Visit our Website:- http://www.artsandmedia.com Audio, music and health pages and interesting links.
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Andy Evans wrote:

First pull the drain hose and put it lower than the drum, if it runs freely the pumps stuck, if slowly the interceptor/filter has something in it, either way you will end up having to drain it and/or flood the floor. Thats why ours is right next to the conservatory door, easy to drain outside! Oh yeas look for a new one pence piece stuck where the hose fits to a spigot if its fully plumbed in, BTDT!#
Niel.
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Water pump failed?
Cheers, Tom

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the knurled shaft. Drill through the impeller & shaft and insert a piece of stainless rod, 1/16" maybe. Seems to last forever after that.
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Check for missing sox, undies ect in the pump or the sump under neathe the machine if no luck with the pre pump filter that is proberbly on the front of the machine.
steve
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Andy Evans wrote:

The first approach depends on whether you like playing with water or electricity! Taking the filter cover off will dump all the water on the floor. It is possible that the pump is jammed. Turen off the power and water Pull out the machine, take off the back and turn the pump by hand (there is usually a fan to get hold of. Assuming this is free to turn, disconnect the wiresfrom the pump and make up a lead with a plug on on end and and connect the other end to the pump. This should make the pump run. If it does not turn, then get ready for the big puddle on the floor method. If it pumps out then - fine. If the pump runs but it does not pump out then you could have a blocked drain pipe. With care and being prepared for the flood, remove the outlet hose and unblock it. Having got the water out and the washing out too. you can then investigate why the pump is not being powered by the controller. Pumps are relatively unversal with the main coice being the relative position of the inlet, outlet and mounting holes. Your local repair shop will possibly sell you a genereic model much cheaper than the manufacturer's spare part.
Good luck
Bob
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This is all very helpful. Now, the machine is currently empty - I've done the 'draining through the front' theatre. Conveniently I live on the 2nd floor. So given that the machine's empty, can I try some other method?
It's looking like the machine needs to come out. I'm fine with electrics, so after I check that the pipe's not blocked, I'll look at the pump. No cute diagnostic tricks I can use before I pull the bloody thing out?
=== Andy Evans ==Visit our Website:- http://www.artsandmedia.com Audio, music and health pages and interesting links.
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On 29 Dec 2003 00:12:44 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnohawker (Andy Evans) wrote:

I have visions of the two flats immediately below you having put up umbrellas..... ;)

Not that I'm aware of.
Make sure you disconnect from the electrical supply before you start diving in (pun not intended).
The pump is a fairly common thing to go wrong. Your mission in removing the back cover will be to locate the pump (shouldn't be hard, it'll be at the bottom), then try spinning the rotor by hand if possible.
PoP
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Before removing anything, and before disconnecting the electricity, if the machine has a rotary electro-mechanical control knob this should be rotated while listening for the pump cutting in.
It also might help if the OP stated make and model.
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Before removing anything, and before disconnecting the electricity, if the machine has a rotary electro-mechanical control knob this should be rotated while listening for the pump cutting in. It also might help if the OP stated make and model.>>
Ah! helpful. But can I do this without water, i.e. by shutting the taps going into the machine? It's a Whirlpool W100 also says "1000" on it.
=== Andy Evans ==Visit our Website:- http://www.artsandmedia.com Audio, music and health pages and interesting links.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnohawker (Andy Evans) wrote in message

I've no experience with Whirlpool machines, but, yes, you should do no harm by trying the pump with water shut off.
If the pump runs you have established that it is not an electrical fault on the pump circuit. It is therefore a blockage or the impeller has come loose on the shaft.
In either case it will then be time to move the machine and start looking inside, either to clear a blockage or to change the pump (neither are big jobs).
Myself, I would try running another cycle - it could have been one of those odd one-off faults; a dirty contact in the controller, perhaps, and the machine might subsequently run OK.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnohawker (Andy Evans) wrote in message

Then the machine is NOT empty. Knowing this will help you avoid flooding.
The basic method to disgnosis is divide and conquer. Each time you can narrow the fault down to anything less than all possible items, youre eliminating some possibles from the list of suspects. Eventually you end up with just one thing on the list.
The water path is as follows: drum short fat wiggly rubber hose in bottom of machine pump - clogged, broken, or burnt out machine drain pipe U bend on wall drain pipe attached to wall. You may also have a filter and a second rubber tube.
Regards, NT
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I found after I drained the thing a trayful at a time that there is a little hose tucked away next to the fluff filter that allows you to drain the pump completely. I bought a replacement pump from one of the internet sites, and the hose connector was fractionally smaller than on the original, which meant a lot of creative tie-wrapping to get it to fit.
John
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On 28/12/2003 "Andy Evans" opined:-

1. Check the drain pipe is not kinked. 2. Check it is not blocked.
Then pull it out, remove the cover and see if there is rotation of the pump. There is often a small cooling fan on the end of the pump shaft, which will give a clue. If there is no rotation, it could be jammed, burnt out, seized or perhaps no supply to the pump.
You can drain it by lowering the pump outlet pipe into a bowl or similar.
Our machines pump stopped working a few months back, it turned out to be some coins simply jamming the pump impellor. The cooling fan fins could be moved a little way, which proved it wasn't seized.
I removed both rubber hoses and got the coins out with a pair of long nosed pliers. Enough for a pint down the pub, in there ;-)
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"Andy Evans" wrote on Sunday (28/12/2003) :

No, don't do that....!
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Harry (M1BYT) (Lap)
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Smell Lad Smell It is often a good idea to give a pump or any motor a quick sniff for burning odour as this may stop you wasting a lot of time with messing around HTH Phil
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