help! can't fix battens to breezeblock wall

I've been trying to fit 2x2" battens to a wall which I think is made of breezeblock (or similar). I've been using "frame fittings" which required me to drill an 8mm hole through the batten and then into the wall, then to insert a 120mm long plastic plug through the batten and into the holes, and finally to tap in and tighten a long thick screw.
When I do this I end up with the screw & plug just rotating in the wall. The plastic plug doesn't have all that much in the way of fins sticking out from it, and I think there's a possibility that they are ending up in the cavity between the two courses of blocks/bricks in the wall.
Is there some other kind of fixing I should try using, or is it worth trying to glue the plastic plus into the wall first, eg with silicon sealant (or something)?
--
Jeremy C B Nicoll - my opinions are my own.

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You shouldn't have this problem with genuine breeze blocks, which are quite hard in comparison to some modern foamed cement blocks like Celcon which I suspect that you have.
I made the mistake of using Celcon blocks to build a workshop very good for insulation but hard to fix things - now if I need to make a stout fixing I'll pierce the wall with a screwdriver and tap the plug directly into to the small hole (ie no drilling) - they are so soft that the plug goes straight in compressing the block.
Andrew
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These blocks sound like soft celcon thermal blocks. These are so soft you can push your finger through them, but they're great for insulating the room and keeping the heat in.
What you'll need is a 5mm hole drilled into the block, then bang the plastic fixing, just the plastic bit without the screw, in to the hole you've made. The fixing will go in because the block will compress away from it when you bang it in with the hammer. Once the fixings are in you put the screw through the hole in the batten and screw it in to the fixing. Make the hole in the batten just big enough to take the screw thread and not allow the head to sink to far into the timber.
This should give a good enough fixing into this type of blockwork.
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What about long drywall screws? They have wide sharp threads and a thin shaft and seem to make a good grip in building blocks If you use enough maybe it would be strong enough.
Sam
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On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 16:43:45 +0000 (GMT), Jeremy C B Nicoll
Gripfill. Just glue the battens to the wall with it.
--
Peter Parry.
http://www.wpp.ltd.uk/
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Thanks to all who replied. I think I must have been wrong about the "breezeblock", and these soft concrete things people have mentioned seem more likely - I've always been amazed at how easily drilling the wall has been. Can anyone say whether the outer course of blocks in the wall is likely to be the same stuff, or should it be something stronger but less good as an insulator? I find it a bit worrying that the weight of the external wall and roof could be supported by these flimsy sounding things.
--
Jeremy C B Nicoll - my opinions are my own.

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wrote:

A piece of A4 paper standing on edge with a few folds in it will support a pan of water! It's all about design - not weight etc.
As for the fixing... try chemical fix or Hilti fix.
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