heating timer setting

hi, i currently set my central heating to come on in the morning and evening, but have just installed a programmable thermostat which allows me to select different temps for different times of the day.
Is it better to have the heating 'on' but at a slightly lower temp settting during the day when i'm out, and overnight, or is it more economical just to have it switch on a bit before i get up, and just before get home from work.
someone told me it is more economical to have the heating on constantly, but couldn't explain whiy...is this true and why??
Thanks,
Paul
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This is similar to the old fallacy where people think it's more economical to keep their hot water cylinder hot all day rather than 'losing' the heat and then heating it up again.
You will *always* lose more heat if you keep the house warm during the day than if you don't. The overall energy loss (= cost to you) will be some form of (temperature difference * time), thus the shorter the time for which you keep your house warm the less it will cost you.
There may be good reasons for keeping the house slightly warm when unoccupied but energy economy isn't one of them.
--
Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

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It's not true.
You have to decide on your priorities - a house at comfortable temperatures at all times, or lower heating bills and one that is too cold sometimes.
--
*How come you never hear about gruntled employees? *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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paul wrote:

In every way I can puzzle it, the answer is no. The only reason why it may be a bad thing to have heating off, is that the boiler efficiency is lower at high peak loads needed to re-heat the house whan it comes on...
Otherwise if the house is warm when it needn't be, its leaking more heat than it needs to.

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wrote:

Surely the boiler, condensing or otherwise, runs at maximum efficiency when on full load with almost cold water coming in the return?
--
Tony Bryer SDA UK 'Software to build on'
http://www.sda.co.uk
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Tony Bryer wrote:

Exactly.
So its efficient when heating from cold, but short cycling it may notbe.
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It isn't more economical. However, the effect will vary considerably depending on your insulation levels. If you have excellent insulation, it will make less of a difference in economy, whilst if you have no insulation and a draughty house, it will make a huge difference.
The same is true of hot water cylinders. With modern levels of insulation, there is no real reason not to run 24/7.
Christian.
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I can only speak for myself but as I work from home my heating is on from 6am to midnight and apart from first thing in the morning the heating rarely kicks in. I do however live in a new house which is timber framed and stuffed to the gills with insulation so that clearly has an effect.
AK
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select
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but
IMO it is better to be on constantly, things like tiled floors are nice and warm at all times. I used to have it timed, the CH would have to come on at about 4:30 am - and be set quite high (no thermostat) - to make the house warm enough for 7:00. Now I leave it on very low all over winter, haven't noticed a huge rise in the gas bill.
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On Wed, 22 Oct 2003 13:16:21 +0100, "PM"

Do you think there may be any truth in this suggestion .
Comfort levels are affected by wall temperature, the air temperature may be warm but if the walls are cold you will feel cold as your body radiates heat towards the cool walls.
Conventional block walls will, if left to cool TOO much will need reheating to bring the comfort level back up. There might be a tendency to overheat the room air temperature while the walls are re-warming (since they have a certain thermal capacity and therefore a thermal lag) , and thus use more energy.
(I wonder if timber framed houses are more comfortable than block built houses for the same insulation level ?).
Paul
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