Green ooze from house wiring

A friend asked me to look at his house wiring because green stuff was oozing out of L & N at most of the 13A sockets in the house. He wasn't kidding - it's like Lyles Golden Syrup, but bright green instead of golden. It is *not* corroding the copper wires at all, but the brass pins of 13A plugs are blackened. The wiring and house are about 25 years old, dry and in vg condition, standard 7/029 T&E. The effect was first noticed about 5 years ago. Earth wires are clean, except where some goo has dripped on them. Insulation is fine - over 100M on the circuit I tested. Stripping back a bit of neutral insulation, the goo appears to be in the strands.
Any ideas?
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roger

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Is it possible to see some detailed online piccys of that?. IIRC wasn't there a thread on this some while ago with PVC insulation melting with no apparent heat cause?..
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Tony Sayer


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Sorry no pics - not much to photo really except shiny copper with translucent green goo. Googled it to death b4 posting - nothing. Insulation is fine electrically and mechanically. ????????
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roger

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writes

I think I foudn it using google: Searching the web for "green goo" and wiring found this on the web (2nd hit):
What is Green Slime or Goo? And do I need to re-wire circuits with Green Slime coming out of the wires?
Also known as "Green Slime", this phenomenon is characterised by the appearance of a sticky green exudate leaking out of PVC-insulated wiring at locations such as switches, hot points and light fittings. The green goo problem is predominantly associated with older (25+ years) TPS-type cables operating in a warm environment. The exudate comprises a plasticiser that has migrated out of the PVC insulation, coloured due to reaction with the copper conductor.
Due to its stickiness and unsightly colour, the goo has a high nuisance value, however it poses no significant health hazard. It may be cleaned from surfaces by wiping with a rag soaked in a petroleum- or alcohol-based solvent (such as meths).
The long-term consequence of the exudate is that it represents a de-plasticising of the insulation, meaning that as the process continues the PVC will eventually become brittle, and crack.
Coutesy of http://www.olex.co.nz/faq_general.php
Jc.
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Verdigris. It's corrosion of copper (and brass) caused by damp. Loose connections causing electrolysis will speed the process.
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*Why do overlook and oversee mean opposite things? *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Hello roger

Not come across that, other than the normal copper corrosion, but that's not gooey afaik. If it is the wires and coming from inside the sleeving, then I'd rewire the affected bits asap - this doesn't sound good at all.
I have experienced goo coming through the ceiling and out of vents before, but that was down to honey leaking from a bees nest.
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Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
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Simon Avery wrote:

Hmmm, perhaps this thread should move to alt.fan.hitchcock? :-)
Seriously, I would have thought verdisgris too but, like Simon, I've never seen it "gooey", only dry and crystalline. Also, doesn't it require oxygen to form? In which case I wouldn't expect to find it *inside* the insulation (although the OP didn't say how far he'd stripped back the PVC).
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It's decidedly Hitchcock. I've spent enough time at sea to be fairly sure it isn't verdigris; the copper is bright, smooth and definitely not corroded. Nearest salt water is 30 miles away. It's as though it is grease-packed waterproof cable, but packed with green syrup.... I must ask Neville to ask his neighbours if they have any similar phenomena.
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roger

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On 6 Aug 2003 21:55:42 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

Not Quatermass??
.andy
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
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wrote:

Hi
Someone suggested cleaning with alcohol: just one point, alcohol contains water, and water conducts. So very thorough drying would be needed (ie plenty of time to dry) before repowering.

At first I read it as 'god' not goo!
Regards, NT
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Just don't make it angry :-)
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122774.news.uni-berlin.de:

mike r
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"25 years old" and "7/0.029" are not compatible attributes. Metric cable came into use around 1970, so either the house is older than you think or you've got stranded 2.5mm^2.
--
Andy



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Thanks guys - I'll relay both on.
Neville has decided to replace stained sockets, clean goo off wire ends, and keep fingers crossed. No sign of embrittlement yet, and as he says as long as he doesn't disturb the wiring it doesn't matter if it does go brittle.
--
roger
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